Monday, April 4, 2011

The Doctor Who Universe

THE TELEVISION CROSSOVER CROSSOVER UNIVERSE LAUNCHED JANUARY 10, 2011 CELEBRATING FOUR YEARS


When I first created this for the book, it was my first post about a reality within the Television Crossover Multiverse, but not the Television Crossover Universe.


At the time, when I first started the TVCU site, I was very much influenced by another author whose work on analyzing crossovers I hold in high esteem. (He's asked not to be named.) In his shared reality, Doctor Who existed in an alternate universe while a version of the Doctor, called Doctor Omega in his early years, existed in the main timeline. There was good solid evidence to support this.


So this became part of the initial mythology of the TVCU, back when part of the premise was that this other author's work on crossover fiction should be incorporated into mine. And so, connecting the dots from Doctor Who, I established what other series, mostly British and/or sci-fi, might also be part of this Whoniverse.


In the past four years, I've realized my Television Crossover Universe, which I've been working on in reality for decades, just wasn't compatible with other people's shared realities. At least, not 100%. While some of my work shared similarities with others, I needed the freedom to do my own thing on my own terms, and I think the TVCU has flourished under that notion.


More recently, in the past three years, while writing the Horror Crossover Encyclopedia, I found that it's better to allow Doctor Who to exist in the Horror Universe (and by extension, the Television Crossover Universe), while placing those few stories in which the Doctor is said to be from another reality as being the Doctor from a separate Whoniverse.


The book post for Doctor Who will be changed to incorporate Doctor Who into the primary Television Crossover Universe. However, here, in this book, I present what that other Doctor Who Universe would look like as a separate reality.


Oh, are you asking Doctor Who? Did I jump the gun? Well, Doctor Who was a science fiction program on the BBC that ran from 1963 to 1989. It was revived in 2005 and is still going strong. If you've never seen it, it airs here in America on BBC America. It's also available on Netflix and Hulu. The show has been going on for a very long time, and they have a neat trick that when the actor is done playing the role of the Doctor, the character (an alien Time Lord) regenerates into a new body, thus a new actor. His companions come and go often as well. Kind of like the cops and lawyers on Law & Order, but without Daleks.


Doctor Who is extremely popular and has been around for 50 years, so you can imagine that there have been plenty of crossovers, especially in published works based on the series, and a few spin-offs.


I have to say, when I was a kid, I didn't really care for the show. There were really bad effects, the aliens didn't look real, and it seemed like they were always just running through tunnels. And they were being chased by garbage cans, and had a pet robot dog.


I had a friend in high school who tried to get me into it. I certainly found some of the concepts regarding Time Lords and the TARDIS to be interesting, but overall, it wasn't for me.


So back around 2005, I started hearing from my online friends about Doctor Who. A lot. Finally, I decided to give it a chance and watched a marathon of the first few seasons of the new show on Netflix, and loved it. I loved it so much that I was willing to try Classic Who again, and I guess with age I learned to appreciate great story telling without a need for lots of action and special effects.


So now I am a Whovian.


The following chronology operates under the presumption that there is a universe centered around Doctor Who. Thus, there will be stories shown to take place in the Whoniverse that could also have happened in the Television Crossover Universe.


Unknown--BRISINGR--In another dimension, this tale of a boy named Eragon and his dragon takes place. In this third novel in the series, the Doctor is mentioned, and it's said that he can travel to other dimensions.


102--DOCTOR WHO--"The Pandorica Opens"--So when Amy was killed by Roman Rory, the Doctor told Rory she's only mostly dead. Perhaps he met Miracle Max once upon a time. Or he saw the movie (because you ever notice for a guy who travels through time and space, he knows a lot of quotes from Earth films.)


123--CHELMSFORD 123--The TARDIS appears.
6th century--The Doctor will eventually become Merlin. Morgan le Fay and Mordred are aliens.


1790--TALES OF THE SHADOWMEN VOLUME 3: DANSE MACABRE “THE HEART OF THE MOON” (SHORT STORY BY MATTHEW BAUGH)--Crosses: Captain Kronos, Vampire Hunter (film); Vampire City (Paul Feval); Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos; Nosferatu; The Vampyre; Doctor Omega; Telzey Amberdon, Solomon Kane, Maciste (Silent Film Series); Maciste (Revival Sword and Sandal Film Series); Baron Munchhausen; Shadow Warriors; Doctor Who; Northwest Smth; Star or Psi Cassiopeia; The Black Stone. Doctor Omega and his companion Telzey Amberdon team up with Captain Kronos, Doctor Grost, Solomon Kane, and Maciste against an army of vampires in Selene, the infamous Vampire City. Another great horror crossover tale from Black Coat’s Tales of the Shadowmen and author Matthew Baugh. Captain Kronos is from the cult classic 70s film. Vampire City is from author Paul Feval, a French novel reprinted and translated to English by Black Coat Press. Of course, the Lovecraft Mythos are the glue that binds the universe. Nosferatu is a classic film that was a very loose adaptation of Dracula (loose enough to be considered a separate story.) The Vampyre is one of the earliest vampire works in literature. Doctor Omega is a French novel that has been conflated in recent times in literature with the Doctor from Doctor Who. Since it’s been published, I consider the theory to be canon. Telzey Amberdon is from her own sci-fi series but here she is the Doctor’s companion. Solomon Kane is an immortal hero of literature, while Maciste is an immortal sword and sorcery hero from films. Originally he was featured in silent films, then decades later was revived in several Italian sword and sorcery films. Though separate series, the two versions are conflated here, so I consider both the same character. Shadow Warriors is a Japanese television series. All the crosses here are considered fully part of the Doctor Who Universe, with all of their works as canon.


1800--FOREIGN DEVILS (NOVEL BY ANDREW CARTMEL)--Setting is 1800 and 1900, and the period of the Second Doctor travelling with Jamie and Zoe. Crosses: Carnacki Ghost Finder. The Doctor is in 1800 at the English Trade Concession in Canton when a relic present activates and transports the Doctor’s companions, Jamie and Zoe, 100 years into the future. The time traveling Doctor manages to track them to their new location and ends up working with Thomas Carnacki to solve a mystery of a series of murders in a house that is removed from space and time. The Doctor regenerates every time he is mortally wounded. This is his second incarnation. The Doctor is a time traveller, so the time periods of the stories are irrelevant to the chronology of the series. However, we can nail down the period within Doctor Who’s fifty year history based on the incarnation of the Doctor and his companions of the time. The Second Doctor’s run was from 1966 - 1969. Jamie (who is originally from 1746) was a companion from 1966 - 1969 as well and Zoe (who is originally from the 21st century) was a companion also from 1968 - 1969. So from a series point of view, this likely occurred during the shows 1968 - 1969 period. This cross brings Carnacki the Ghost Finder into the Doctor Who Universe.


1839--THE DEATH OF ART (NOVEL BY SIMON BUCHER-JONES)--Setting is 1880s and the era of the Seventh Doctor, Chris, Roz and Ace. Crosses: The King in Yellow; C. Auguste Dupin; Sherlock Holmes; Hercule Poirot. In 1880s France, the Doctor and his companions must deal with a rip in time. Though the setting is the 1880s, the Doctor is a time traveller, and chronologically this story takes place after the end of the original Doctor Who series but prior to the TV Movie. Characters from the King In Yellow appear. The Rue Morgue is featured. A novel by Moriarty appears. And a Sgt. Poirot is involved.


1844--CHRISTMAS CAROL: THE MOVIE--Not only does the same actor (Simon Callow) play Charles Dickens in both Doctor Who episodes "The Unquiet Dead" and "Wedding of River Song", but also plays him in Christmas Carol: The Movie. In fact, his dress, his beard, everything is the same. EVEN THE STAGE AND THE SPEECH HE GIVES TO INTRODUCE THE STORY IS THE SAME, EXCEPT IN THE MOVIE, THE STORY IS INTERRUPTED BRIEFLY BY A MOUSE RATHER THAN BY GHOSTS. I MEAN IT'S EXACTLY THE SAME!!! So though the main portion of the movie, which is animated, is fictional, the framing parts are in the Doctor Who Universe. Merry Christmas. Incidentally, the movie was made four years before the DW episode, which means the DW folks were apparently big fans of this film to not only get the same actor, but recreate the first scene exactly, props, costumes, scripts, and all, well, until the Doctor shows up and it all goes to Hell as usual.


January 1863—Doctor Who: Backtime; Dick O’Neil and Frank Langford, published in Countdown 33-39--The Third Doctor gives Lincoln detailed plans about the Battle of Gettysburg to ensure a Union Victory.


1863--PREDATOR: HELL COME A WALKIN'--Union and Confederate soldiers work together to hunt a Predator.


April 5, 1865—Doctor Who: Blood and Hope; Iain McLaughlin--The Fifth Doctor protects Lincoln from an assassination attempt in Richmond, Virginia.


April 14, 1865—Doctor Who: Minuet in Hell; radio drama--The Eighth Doctor warns Lincoln not to go to the theater, but Lincoln does not take his advice. It is unclear why the Doctor wished to interfere with historical events, especially events that struck to0 close to the histories of the Great Ones.


1870s--CAMERA OBSCURA (NOVEL BY LLOYD ROSE)--Setting is July - August 1893 and the period of the Eighth Doctor, Fitz and Anji. Crosses: Buffy the Vampire Slayer; Sherlock Holmes. The Doctor finally recovers his missing heart. In 1893 London, the Doctor rents 221B Baker Street, the residence of Sherlock Holmes (who was presumed dead at this time) and encounters a bloody awful poet named William, who will some day become the vampire Spike, foe and later lover of Buffy the Vampire Slayer. This story features the Eighth Doctor, who until recently had only appeared in the TV movie. Thus from a Doctor Who chronology perspective, this takes place between the TV movie and the Time War.


1874—Alice’s Journey Beyond the Moon; R. J. Carter & Lucy Wright--Alice travels to the Wonderlandian moon and has a series of uninteresting adventures. While there, she meets her old friends the Mad Hatter and the March Hare, but they are operating incognito for some unknown reason. She also encounters Achilles and the Tortoise from Carroll’s piece “What the Tortoise Said to Achilles.” At present it is unclear how the pair came to be on the Wonderlandian moon. There is one disturbing effect to the acknowledgement that this novel is part of the Doctor Who Universe (Whoniverse). This novel is seen in Dream’s library in Neil Gaiman’s comic series The Sandman, and thus the events of the Sandman comic series is drawn into the Whoniverse as Alice’s Journey Beyond the Moon exists in both universes. A number of other crossovers exist that strongly suggest that The Sandman exists within the confines of the Whoniverse. In the Sandman storyline The Kindly Ones, Dream (the protagonist) meets with some allies in the Wood Between Worlds, a place which originally appeared in C. S. Lewis’ The Magician’s Nephew. In the Doctor Who novel Happy Endings, the version of Death from the Sandman comics attends Bernice Summerfield’s wedding. In Simon R. Green’s Drinking Midnight Wine (which is crossed in through a host of other internal crossovers, as well as by being a spinoff of sorts to the already crossed in Nightside novels), Death has a long conversation with Toby Dexter after he takes a bullet to the head (he got better). The Magdalene Grimoire, from the first issue of Sandman, appears in the Angel episode “Hell Bound.” Some questionable crossovers with the Sandman also exist. Rhys Thomas’ The Suicide Club, which is supposedly a semi-sequel to Robert Lewis Stevenson’s Suicide Club stories, features several appearances by “Death of the Endless.” Versions of Dream and Death appear in Planetary #7, there are a number of continuity differences between Planetary and the Whoniverse, but according to the research of Jess Nevins. Destiny is very similar to Lord Dunsany’s character “The Thing that is Neither God nor Beast, Trogool”; because of the interconnected relation between Dunsany and Lovecraft’s work, Trogool may or may not exist in the Whoniverse. If it does, that provides a strong link between The Sandman and the Whoniverse. Some readers may now be wondering what the issue of inclusion is; there is a number of universes, and the Endless exist in all worlds serving their goals. Despite this, inclusion of the Sandman as is would shatter the established cosmology of the Whoniverse; Satan has not abandoned Hell (though he is not bound to remain within Hell, yet) to the command of angels, nor as the sequel series Lucifer shows has the God of the Hebrew and Christian religions died to make way for a girl of pantheistic intentions. To avoid the problems with Sandman’s inclusion to the Whoniverse, and follow the evidence presented, is not a difficult problem. The best position to assume is that most of the Sandman stories take place within the Whoniverse (or, dear reader, if you believe the universe shown in DC Comics exists, it may take place there), but many are outright fictions with no basis in truth. Other stories are a mix and match of truth and fantasy. [This entry is taken from James Bojaciuk’s Wonderland book post, adapted for this timeline.]

THE TELEVISION CROSSOVER CROSSOVER UNIVERSE LAUNCHED JANUARY 10, 2011 CELEBRATING FOUR YEARS

When I first created this for the book, it was my first post about a reality within the Television Crossover Multiverse, but not the Television Crossover Universe.

At the time, when I first started the TVCU site, I was very much influenced by another author whose work on analyzing crossovers I hold in high esteem. (He's asked not to be named.) In his shared reality, Doctor Who existed in an alternate universe while a version of the Doctor, called Doctor Omega in his early years, existed in the main timeline. There was good solid evidence to support this.

So this became part of the initial mythology of the TVCU, back when part of the premise was that this other author's work on crossover fiction should be incorporated into mine. And so, connecting the dots from Doctor Who, I established what other series, mostly British and/or sci-fi, might also be part of this Whoniverse.

In the past four years, I've realized my Television Crossover Universe, which I've been working on in reality for decades, just wasn't compatible with other people's shared realities. At least, not 100%. While some of my work shared similarities with others, I needed the freedom to do my own thing on my own terms, and I think the TVCU has flourished under that notion.

More recently, in the past three years, while writing the Horror Crossover Encyclopedia, I found that it's better to allow Doctor Who to exist in the Horror Universe (and by extension, the Television Crossover Universe), while placing those few stories in which the Doctor is said to be from another reality as being the Doctor from a separate Whoniverse.

The book post for Doctor Who will be changed to incorporate Doctor Who into the primary Television Crossover Universe. However, here, in this book, I present what that other Doctor Who Universe would look like as a separate reality.

Oh, are you asking Doctor Who? Did I jump the gun? Well, Doctor Who was a science fiction program on the BBC that ran from 1963 to 1989. It was revived in 2005 and is still going strong. If you've never seen it, it airs here in America on BBC America. It's also available on Netflix and Hulu. The show has been going on for a very long time, and they have a neat trick that when the actor is done playing the role of the Doctor, the character (an alien Time Lord) regenerates into a new body, thus a new actor. His companions come and go often as well. Kind of like the cops and lawyers on Law & Order, but without Daleks.

Doctor Who is extremely popular and has been around for 50 years, so you can imagine that there have been plenty of crossovers, especially in published works based on the series, and a few spin-offs.

I have to say, when I was a kid, I didn't really care for the show. There were really bad effects, the aliens didn't look real, and it seemed like they were always just running through tunnels. And they were being chased by garbage cans, and had a pet robot dog.

I had a friend in high school who tried to get me into it. I certainly found some of the concepts regarding Time Lords and the TARDIS to be interesting, but overall, it wasn't for me.

So back around 2005, I started hearing from my online friends about Doctor Who. A lot. Finally, I decided to give it a chance and watched a marathon of the first few seasons of the new show on Netflix, and loved it. I loved it so much that I was willing to try Classic Who again, and I guess with age I learned to appreciate great story telling without a need for lots of action and special effects.

So now I am a Whovian.

The following chronology operates under the presumption that there is a universe centered around Doctor Who. Thus, there will be stories shown to take place in the Whoniverse that could also have happened in the Television Crossover Universe.

Unknown--BRISINGR--In another dimension, this tale of a boy named Eragon and his dragon takes place. In this third novel in the series, the Doctor is mentioned, and it's said that he can travel to other dimensions.

102--DOCTOR WHO--"The Pandorica Opens"--So when Amy was killed by Roman Rory, the Doctor told Rory she's only mostly dead. Perhaps he met Miracle Max once upon a time. Or he saw the movie (because you ever notice for a guy who travels through time and space, he knows a lot of quotes from Earth films.)

123--CHELMSFORD 123--The TARDIS appears.
6th century--The Doctor will eventually become Merlin. Morgan le Fay and Mordred are aliens.

1790--TALES OF THE SHADOWMEN VOLUME 3: DANSE MACABRE “THE HEART OF THE MOON” (SHORT STORY BY MATTHEW BAUGH)--Crosses: Captain Kronos, Vampire Hunter (film); Vampire City (Paul Feval); Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos; Nosferatu; The Vampyre; Doctor Omega; Telzey Amberdon, Solomon Kane, Maciste (Silent Film Series); Maciste (Revival Sword and Sandal Film Series); Baron Munchhausen; Shadow Warriors; Doctor Who; Northwest Smth; Star or Psi Cassiopeia; The Black Stone. Doctor Omega and his companion Telzey Amberdon team up with Captain Kronos, Doctor Grost, Solomon Kane, and Maciste against an army of vampires in Selene, the infamous Vampire City. Another great horror crossover tale from Black Coat’s Tales of the Shadowmen and author Matthew Baugh. Captain Kronos is from the cult classic 70s film. Vampire City is from author Paul Feval, a French novel reprinted and translated to English by Black Coat Press. Of course, the Lovecraft Mythos are the glue that binds the universe. Nosferatu is a classic film that was a very loose adaptation of Dracula (loose enough to be considered a separate story.) The Vampyre is one of the earliest vampire works in literature. Doctor Omega is a French novel that has been conflated in recent times in literature with the Doctor from Doctor Who. Since it’s been published, I consider the theory to be canon. Telzey Amberdon is from her own sci-fi series but here she is the Doctor’s companion. Solomon Kane is an immortal hero of literature, while Maciste is an immortal sword and sorcery hero from films. Originally he was featured in silent films, then decades later was revived in several Italian sword and sorcery films. Though separate series, the two versions are conflated here, so I consider both the same character. Shadow Warriors is a Japanese television series. All the crosses here are considered fully part of the Doctor Who Universe, with all of their works as canon.

1800--FOREIGN DEVILS (NOVEL BY ANDREW CARTMEL)--Setting is 1800 and 1900, and the period of the Second Doctor travelling with Jamie and Zoe. Crosses: Carnacki Ghost Finder. The Doctor is in 1800 at the English Trade Concession in Canton when a relic present activates and transports the Doctor’s companions, Jamie and Zoe, 100 years into the future. The time traveling Doctor manages to track them to their new location and ends up working with Thomas Carnacki to solve a mystery of a series of murders in a house that is removed from space and time. The Doctor regenerates every time he is mortally wounded. This is his second incarnation. The Doctor is a time traveller, so the time periods of the stories are irrelevant to the chronology of the series. However, we can nail down the period within Doctor Who’s fifty year history based on the incarnation of the Doctor and his companions of the time. The Second Doctor’s run was from 1966 - 1969. Jamie (who is originally from 1746) was a companion from 1966 - 1969 as well and Zoe (who is originally from the 21st century) was a companion also from 1968 - 1969. So from a series point of view, this likely occurred during the shows 1968 - 1969 period. This cross brings Carnacki the Ghost Finder into the Doctor Who Universe.

1839--THE DEATH OF ART (NOVEL BY SIMON BUCHER-JONES)--Setting is 1880s and the era of the Seventh Doctor, Chris, Roz and Ace. Crosses: The King in Yellow; C. Auguste Dupin; Sherlock Holmes; Hercule Poirot. In 1880s France, the Doctor and his companions must deal with a rip in time. Though the setting is the 1880s, the Doctor is a time traveller, and chronologically this story takes place after the end of the original Doctor Who series but prior to the TV Movie. Characters from the King In Yellow appear. The Rue Morgue is featured. A novel by Moriarty appears. And a Sgt. Poirot is involved.

1844--CHRISTMAS CAROL: THE MOVIE--Not only does the same actor (Simon Callow) play Charles Dickens in both Doctor Who episodes "The Unquiet Dead" and "Wedding of River Song", but also plays him in Christmas Carol: The Movie. In fact, his dress, his beard, everything is the same. EVEN THE STAGE AND THE SPEECH HE GIVES TO INTRODUCE THE STORY IS THE SAME, EXCEPT IN THE MOVIE, THE STORY IS INTERRUPTED BRIEFLY BY A MOUSE RATHER THAN BY GHOSTS. I MEAN IT'S EXACTLY THE SAME!!! So though the main portion of the movie, which is animated, is fictional, the framing parts are in the Doctor Who Universe. Merry Christmas. Incidentally, the movie was made four years before the DW episode, which means the DW folks were apparently big fans of this film to not only get the same actor, but recreate the first scene exactly, props, costumes, scripts, and all, well, until the Doctor shows up and it all goes to Hell as usual.

January 1863—Doctor Who: Backtime; Dick O’Neil and Frank Langford, published in Countdown 33-39--The Third Doctor gives Lincoln detailed plans about the Battle of Gettysburg to ensure a Union Victory.

1863--PREDATOR: HELL COME A WALKIN'--Union and Confederate soldiers work together to hunt a Predator.

April 5, 1865—Doctor Who: Blood and Hope; Iain McLaughlin--The Fifth Doctor protects Lincoln from an assassination attempt in Richmond, Virginia.

April 14, 1865—Doctor Who: Minuet in Hell; radio drama--The Eighth Doctor warns Lincoln not to go to the theater, but Lincoln does not take his advice. It is unclear why the Doctor wished to interfere with historical events, especially events that struck to0 close to the histories of the Great Ones.

1870s--CAMERA OBSCURA (NOVEL BY LLOYD ROSE)--Setting is July - August 1893 and the period of the Eighth Doctor, Fitz and Anji. Crosses: Buffy the Vampire Slayer; Sherlock Holmes. The Doctor finally recovers his missing heart. In 1893 London, the Doctor rents 221B Baker Street, the residence of Sherlock Holmes (who was presumed dead at this time) and encounters a bloody awful poet named William, who will some day become the vampire Spike, foe and later lover of Buffy the Vampire Slayer. This story features the Eighth Doctor, who until recently had only appeared in the TV movie. Thus from a Doctor Who chronology perspective, this takes place between the TV movie and the Time War.

1874—Alice’s Journey Beyond the Moon; R. J. Carter & Lucy Wright--Alice travels to the Wonderlandian moon and has a series of uninteresting adventures. While there, she meets her old friends the Mad Hatter and the March Hare, but they are operating incognito for some unknown reason. She also encounters Achilles and the Tortoise from Carroll’s piece “What the Tortoise Said to Achilles.” At present it is unclear how the pair came to be on the Wonderlandian moon. There is one disturbing effect to the acknowledgement that this novel is part of the Doctor Who Universe (Whoniverse). This novel is seen in Dream’s library in Neil Gaiman’s comic series The Sandman, and thus the events of the Sandman comic series is drawn into the Whoniverse as Alice’s Journey Beyond the Moon exists in both universes. A number of other crossovers exist that strongly suggest that The Sandman exists within the confines of the Whoniverse. In the Sandman storyline The Kindly Ones, Dream (the protagonist) meets with some allies in the Wood Between Worlds, a place which originally appeared in C. S. Lewis’ The Magician’s Nephew. In the Doctor Who novel Happy Endings, the version of Death from the Sandman comics attends Bernice Summerfield’s wedding. In Simon R. Green’s Drinking Midnight Wine (which is crossed in through a host of other internal crossovers, as well as by being a spinoff of sorts to the already crossed in Nightside novels), Death has a long conversation with Toby Dexter after he takes a bullet to the head (he got better). The Magdalene Grimoire, from the first issue of Sandman, appears in the Angel episode “Hell Bound.” Some questionable crossovers with the Sandman also exist. Rhys Thomas’ The Suicide Club, which is supposedly a semi-sequel to Robert Lewis Stevenson’s Suicide Club stories, features several appearances by “Death of the Endless.” Versions of Dream and Death appear in Planetary #7, there are a number of continuity differences between Planetary and the Whoniverse, but according to the research of Jess Nevins. Destiny is very similar to Lord Dunsany’s character “The Thing that is Neither God nor Beast, Trogool”; because of the interconnected relation between Dunsany and Lovecraft’s work, Trogool may or may not exist in the Whoniverse. If it does, that provides a strong link between The Sandman and the Whoniverse. Some readers may now be wondering what the issue of inclusion is; there is a number of universes, and the Endless exist in all worlds serving their goals. Despite this, inclusion of the Sandman as is would shatter the established cosmology of the Whoniverse; Satan has not abandoned Hell (though he is not bound to remain within Hell, yet) to the command of angels, nor as the sequel series Lucifer shows has the God of the Hebrew and Christian religions died to make way for a girl of pantheistic intentions. To avoid the problems with Sandman’s inclusion to the Whoniverse, and follow the evidence presented, is not a difficult problem. The best position to assume is that most of the Sandman stories take place within the Whoniverse (or, dear reader, if you believe the universe shown in DC Comics exists, it may take place there), but many are outright fictions with no basis in truth. Other stories are a mix and match of truth and fantasy. [This entry is taken from James Bojaciuk’s Wonderland book post, adapted for this timeline.]


February to April 1887--ALL-CONSUMING FIRE (NOVEL BY ANDY LANE)--Setting is February to April 1887 though the Doctor himself is a time traveller whose original time period is unknown, but assumed to be contemporary. Crosses: Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos; Anno Dracula; Kolchak the Night Stalker; Sherlock Holmes; Lost World, Fu Manchu; Inspector Cribb; T.S. Ellliot’s The Waste Land. The seventh Doctor meets Holmes and Watson and together they defeat an Old One called Azathoth. This story brings in Kolchak the Night Stalker to the Doctor Who Universe.

Winter 1896--TALES OF THE SHADOWMEN VOLUME 5: THE VAMPIRES OF PARIS--The Doctor seeks the aid of Professor Moriarty to stop a meteor from striking the Earth. The Doctor gains a new companion, Zephyrin Xirdal (originally from THE CHASE OF THE GOLDEN METEOR). The Doctor's intervention on May 4, 1891 explains how Moriarty survived his battle with SHERLOCK HOLMES at Reichenbach Falls. The meteor in question is the one that eventually caused the TUNGUSKA EVENT.


May to August 1898--LEAGUE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENTLEMEN VOLUME 1--There are tons of crossovers, which I'll mention in a moment. But why this is on this chronology is that this ties into the show EASTENDERS. That show is in the Whoniverse and League is in the Whoniverse. OK, so now the crossovers: ALLAN QUATERMAIN, DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE, 20000 LEAGUE UNDER THE SEA, INVISIBLE MAN, DRACULA, FU MANCHU, SHERLOCK HOLMES, C. AUGUSTE DUPIN, CAMPION BOND, WAR OF THE WORLDS, JAMES BOND, L'ASSOMMOIR, ROSA COOTE, MISS FLAYBUM, THE CORRECTIONAL ACADEMY FOR WAYWARD GENTLEWOMEN, THE YELLOW ROOM, MOBY DICK, SEXTON BLAKE, INSPECTOR DICK DONOVAN, ROBUR THE CONQUEROR, THE WARDEN, PALLISER/PARLIAMENTARY, DAVID COPPERFIELD, THE BOSTONIANS, WHAT KATY DID, REBECCA OF SUNNYBROOK FARM, POLLYANNA, LORD AND LADY POKINGHAM, GULLIVER'S TRAVELS, NATTY BUMPO, SIR PERCY BLAKENEY, DR. SYN, FANNY HILL, CAPTAIN MORS, JOURNEY TO THE CENTER OF THE EARTH, THE FIRST MEN IN THE MOON, LIMEHOUSE NIGHTS, TREASURE ISLAND, BROAD ARROW JACK, KLIMO, DR. NIKOLA, FUTILITY, AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS, FIVE WEEKS IN A BALLOON, OLIVER TWIST, ALLY SLOPER, WEARY WILLY AND TIRED TIM, THE HUGE HUNTER, THE PURPLE PINAEUM, THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY, PICKMAN'S MODEL, THE CABINET OF DR. CALIGARI, UTOPIA, ZENDA, FLATLAND, THE COMING RACE, THE LOST WORLD, ALICE IN WONDERLAND, THE STEAM HOUSE, SAPATHWA, JACK HARKAWAY'S SCHOOLDAYS, VARNEY THE VAMPIRE, SOME WORDS WITH A MUMMY, SPRING-HEELED JACK, THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD, SWEENEY TODD, A NEW ACCELERATOR, DIXON BRENT, WU FANG, GUNGA DIN, THE MOONSTONE, THE JUNGLE BOOK, DR. DOLITTLE, THE BLACK CAT, GREAT EXPECTATIONS, THE PREMATURE BURIAL, THE MAN IN THE IRON MASK, MCTEAGUE, THE MONSTER OF LAKE LAMETRIE, NICK CARTER, CTHULHU, BILLY BUNTER, A.J. RAFFLES, FRANKENSTEIN, CARMILLA, A CONNECTICUT YANKEE IN KING ARTHUR'S COURT, HEART OF DARKNESS, LONE RANGER, LEGEND OF SLEEPY HOLLOW, THE FOUR FEATHERS, FROM THE EARTH TO THE MOON, UN EXPRESS DE L'AVENIR, MELMOTH THE WANDERER, ARSENE LUPIN, THE ISLAND OF DR. MOREAU, EARTH-SPIRIT, HOBSON'S CHOICE, THE CRYSTAL EGG, VENUS IN FURS, UBU ROI, HARRY FLASHMAN, THE BEETLE, and THE PURPLE TERROR.

August 1898--TALES OF THE SHADOWMEN VOLUME 2: GENTLEMEN OF THE NIGHT “THE VANISHING DIAMONDS” (SHORT STORY BY SYLVIE MILLER AND PHILLIPPE WARD)--Setting is 1898 during the events of League of Extraordinary Gentlemen as well as 1626. Crosses: The Invisible Man (novel); Joseph Jorkens; Allan Quatermain; 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea; The Time Machine; The Lost World; Sherlock Holmes; Ironcastle; Three Musketeers; League of Extraordinary Gentlemen; The Chase of the Golden Meteor; Doctor Omega; the Wandering Jew. At a club frequented by adventurers, a disagreement about historical events prompts the Time Traveller to return to the past to set the record straight. Club members include Quatermain, Nemo, and Griffin (the Invisible Man). Note that Doctor Omega has been shown in other stories to be the same character as the Doctor from the television series Doctor Who.

August to September 1898--LEAGUE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENTLEMEN VOLUME II--This story is in the Whoniverse, as there is an appearance of Doctor Omega, and we've already established that this is the Doctor in his first incarnation prior to the start of the series. Note that Eastenders is also referred to here. Too many crossovers to go into detail, so I'll just list them for the sake of knowing what is being included: JOHN CARTER, GULLIVER OF MARS, ALLAN QUATERMAIN, DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE, 20000 LEAGUES UNDER THE SEA, INVISIBLE MAN, DRACULA, WAR OF THE WORLDS, JAMES BOND, SHERLOCK HOLMES, DR. MOREAU, C.S. LEWIS' SPACE TRILOGY, JUMBO THE ELEPHANT, TIGER TIME, RUPERT THE BEAR, WIND IN THE WILLOWS, MICHAEL MOORCOCK'S MARS SERIES, THE CRYSTAL EGG, DR. NIKOLA, THE WARDEN, BLEAK HOUSE, COLONEL BLIMP, THE LIZARD, ACROSS THE ZODIAC, FROM THE EARTH TO THE MOON, A TALE OF THE RAGGED MOUNTAINS, A VISIT TO THE MOON, PHRA THE PHOENICIAN, ALICE IN WONDERLAND, LEPIDUS THE CENTURION, THE RAVEN, SPRING-HEELED JACK, ALADDIN, A CONNECTICUT YANKEE IN KING ARTHUR'S COURT, A PLUNGE IN SPACE, BARON MUNCHAUSEN, THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY, DOCTOR SYN, WIZARD AND HOTSPUR, THE SCARLET PIMPERNEL, THE BEETLE, THE BRUSHWOOD BOY, GULLIVER'S TRAVELS, BROAD-ARROW JACK, ALLY SLOPER AND WEARY WILLY, THE WOLF MAN, .007, A CRYSTAL AGE. These are just from the main story. Please refer to Jess Nevins' annotations for a list of crossovers in the New Traveller's Almanac. Note that because of the easy use of public domain by writers of "crossover fiction", I automatically assume that most public domain literature is in the Whoniverse, even if I haven't been presented with a crossover.

March to August 1905--DOCTOR OMEGA--Doctor Omega was a character created by Arnould Galopin, and it wasn't about the Doctor. But when Jean-Marc and Randy Lofficier adapted the book, they conflated him with the Doctor, something many, including myself, have decided to go with as official. But my theories stray a little bit from the mainstream. (Yes, Ivan, theories...) When the Doctor Who series begins, the Doctor is over 900 year old. We also know that he stole the TARDIS. My theory is that for many centuries, he was a fugitive, and managed to use the chameleon circuit. Now in this particular adventure, the first published appearance of Doctor Omega, he and his companions travel to the Mars of several million years ago, and return with a Martian named Tiziraou. ARSENE LUPIN is mentioned. Doctor Omega also appears in LEAGUE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENTLEMEN VOLUME II along with Tiziraou. Dr. Caresco is mentioned, who is from THE NECESSARY EVIL. Note that in the book, it is townspeople that call him Doctor Omega, at which point he chooses to maintain the name. Greg Glick has pointed out that the first Time Lord was named Omega, and the Doctor may have felt honored to be named thusly. Recently the idea has been presented, but with no solid confirmation, that H.G. Wells' THE CHRONAL ARGONAUTS featured the First Doctor in the earliest part of his time in the TVCU, before he became known as Doctor Omega.

1908--X-FILES--TUNGUSKA.

1912 - APR - THE LOST TRACK OF TIME - Ivan and Fritz Schabloski arrive from the year 2013 and find themselves aboard the RMS Titanic's maiden voyage. The ship seems frozen in time except for Fritz, Ivan, and the Hounds of Langalos that are pursuing them. The only other person they can interact with is I. P. Freely, who claims to be the First Officer. Freely (who was expecting a different pair of brothers) pushes back the hounds and reveals that Ivan and Fritz are trapped inside a fixed moment in time, but he is able to return them to 2013 by undoing the changes he already made to the timeline. The RMS Titanic sank on its maiden voyage, a trip that has appeared in numerous works of fiction (including TIME BANDITS, GHOSTBUSTERS II, and TITANIC, just to name a few). The Hounds of Langalos are derived from Frank Belknap Long's "The Hounds of Tindalos" (1931) and Stephen King's "The Langoliers" (1990), suggesting the two races of temporal predators are the same or have interbred. The concept of 'fixed points in time' is from the BBC tv series Doctor Who (1963 to present). I. P. Freely was an alias used by the angel Balthazar when he (temporarily) saved the Titanic in SUPERNATURAL season 6 episode 17 "My Heart Will Go On" (2011). [See the Bedrock Anomaly for an explanation regarding Crazy Ivan.]

1915—New Adventures of Alice; John Rae--Betsy Maynard stumbles into a universe that may have been Wonderland, there finding herself in an archive of “books that were never written.” She finds another adventure of Alice Liddell in this archive, and contents herself reading this lost adventure until she finally is pulled back into her own world. Unfortunately, much of Lewis Carroll’s style was lost in transmission from the adventure Carroll never truly wrote to Betsy, then to John Rae, then to the final printed edition. There is some question as to where exactly Betsy ended up. If she arrived in a Wonderlandian archive, she has the unique distinction of being the only child to arrive there not named Alice (or some variant thereof). However, it is difficult to square Betsy’s tale of how the archive looked like a dusty attic with the idea of a Wonderlandian archive. There is a more logical explanation to where she ended up, however. The Doctor Who episodes “Silence in the Library” and “Forest of the Dead” feature a planet library that holds in stock every book ever written. This planet is termed, simply, The Library. It is possible that eventually the library began to import and stock books not from The Library’s home universe, and a portion of this is the archive Betsy stumbled into. If so, this holds gloomy portents for the future of The Library. Jorge Luis Borges examines in his classic short story “The Library of Babel” the idea of a dystopian library that contains every possible variant text for every book ever conceived. Nearly all of these books are useless gibberish. Perhaps The Library the Doctor encountered in his adventures is the same as Borges’ library, only several centuries before the collection overextended itself past the thick line to madness. Betsy’s sojourn there takes place between these two events, but much closer to the Doctor’s visit.

March 1917--TALES OF THE SHADOWMEN VOLUME 4: LORDS OF TERROR--"Three Men, A Martian, and a Baby"--En route to Earth, Kal-L's rocket crashes into the Doctor's TARDIS. The Doctor fixes the rocket and sends the baby onto its original destination.

Summer 1933--A BOOK OF WIZARDS “SORCERER CONJURER WIZARD WITCH” (SHORT STORY BY KIM NEWMAN)--Series: Diogenes Club. Crosses: Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos; Dracula (novel); Carnacki Ghost Finder; Chandu the Magician; The Magician; Rosemary’s Baby; A Visit to Anselm Oakes; The Black Cat; Casting the Runes; The Picture of Dorian Gray; Varney the Vampyre; Pandora and the Flying Dutchman; The Department of Queer Complaints; Green Tea; Carmilla; The Vampyre; Dr. Silence; The Dream Detective; The Secrets of Dr. Taverner; Some Ghost Stories; Sherlock Holmes; Fu Manchu; Fantomas; Arsene Lupin; Kim Newman’s works; Decline and Fall/Return of the Native; Dr. Nikola; Doctor Who; The Man Who Would Be King; Blandings Castle Saga; Henry Merrivale; Bulldog Drummond; The Green Archer; The Saint; Sexton Blake; Jeeves and Wooster; Hercule Poirot; Rebecca; Lord Peter Wimsey; Philo Vance; Miss Marple; The Hands of Mr. Ottermole; The Drones Club; The Duc de Richelieu; Harry Dickson. Charles Beauregard of the Diogenes Club becomes involved in a wizard war. All the crosses above have characters or things that either appear or are referenced in this story. As usual, Kim Newman packs another story chock full of crossover goodness. By now, I don’t think I need to explain Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos or Dracula. Carnacki is the famed Ghost Finder. Chandu is the main character of a 1930s radio series and two film serials. Both the films and the radio series are considered different perspectives of the same series, so the Chandu of this tale is the character from both radio and film. The Magician is a 1908 novel by W. Somerset Maugham. It is a story loosely based on true life occultist Aleister Crowley. Rosemary’s Baby is a classic movie about a woman impregnated by the devil. A Visit to Anselm Oakes is another story featuring a character based on Crowley, this time written by Christopher Isherwood. The Black Cat is another classic horror film. Casting the Runes is a collection of ghost stories by Montague Rhodes James. The Picture of Dorian Gray is the classic tale of the man who was immortal, while his picture aged. Varney the Vampire aka the Feast of Blood is one of the earliest vampire tales. Pandora and the Flying Dutchman is a tale of of woman named Pandora (who isn’t the one with the box), who becomes involved in events involving the legendary ghost. The Department of Queer Complaints from Carter Dickson is a secret group that solves cases that are unusual and unexplained. Green Tea is a story by J. Sheridan le Fanu, the author of Carmilla. And speaking of which, Carmilla is of course one of the first vampire books to have survived to today. The Vampyre is the book which features Lord Ruthven, who not only likely wrote the Ruthvenian (the vampire bible) but may also have been Angelus aka Angel (real name Liam) from Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel. Dr. Silence is Algernon Blackwood’s occult detective. The Dream Detective is Sax Rohmer’s occult detective Morris Klaw. The Secrets of Dr. Taverner are the adventures of “the occult Sherlock Holmes”. And I wasn’t being funny with Some Ghost Stories. This is a reference to a collection of stories from Alfred McLelland Burrage.


August 22, 1933--EATER OF WASPS-- The Doctor says that he met Tarzan.

Late August 1936--Predator: The Pride at Nghasa--A series of night attacks decimate the workers during the building of a new railroad, prompting a famous hunter, two park rangers and their African assistant to track down and fight what the locals call a 'demon of the forest' that is said to appear only when the 'hunting star' crosses the sky.

early 20th century, four decades after the 1898 Martian invasion--SCARLET TRACES: THE GREAT GAME # 1 - 4 (DARK HORSE COMICS)--Series: War of the Worlds (novel), Crosses: Kolchak the Night Stalker; The Man Who Would Be King; First Men in the Moon; Dan Dare; Doctor Who; Fantastic Four; John Carter; Out of the Silent Planet; Perelandra, The war between England and Mars continues. This is a continuation of the divergent steampunk reality first introduced in Scarlet Traces.

August 17, 1939--GLIMMERGLASS: THE CREATIVE WRITER'S ANNUAL VOLUME 1--"The Deadly Desert Gnome"--Story by Dennis Power. This story comes right out and says that the Doctor is Doctor Omega. In this story, the Doctor is accompanied by his granddaughter Susan, who calls herself Suzette. So this story likely takes place shortly before the start of the series. They visit New York where time was altered to cause New York's destruction, and must go back and set things right by making sure that Doc Savage will be around to save the day. They also visit Oz, or one of the Ozes. Likely the Oz they visit must be the one from Farmer's A BARNSTORMER IN OZ considering the author of this story. The Doctor and Susan encounter another time traveler, Phineas Bogg of VOYAGERS. The Doctor also mentions (as he is known to drop references) THE ANDROMEDA STRAIN, the Eddorians (from the LENSMEN series), and the Gamma Quadrant, as designated at this time by the Vulcans and later used by the United Federation of Planets of STAR TREK. Note that Doc Savage here is called Doc Ardan. These two characters have been regularly conflated just as the Doctor and Doctor Omega, even though they were created as separate characters. To confuse things further, Doc Savage is also referred to Doc Wildman by many mythographers.

1949--TALES OF THE SHADOWMEN VOLUME 6: GRAND GUIGNOL “THE CHILDREN OF HERACLES” (STORY BY ROMAN LEARY)--Crosses: Behemoth the Sea Monster; the Magnetic Monster; Kolchak the Night Stalker; The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms; Night of the Living Dead; Phantoms; Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos; “The Stephen King Universe” (the works of Stephen King); Nyctalope; Andromeda Strain; Quatermass; Doctor Who; Big Bad John; Six Million Dollar Man. The heroic Nyctalope is in California teaming with Professor Quatermass against the evil Agent Lord. There are appearances of characters from Behemoth the Sea Monster, the Magnetic Monster, Kolchak the Night Stalker, Big Bad John, and the Beast from 20,000 Fathoms. Behemoth the Sea Monster is a 1959 monster film. The Magnetic Monster is a 1953 monster movie. Kolchak the Night Stalker is a 1970s television series about a reporter who investigates the unknown, particularly the supernatural. The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms is another 1953 giant sea monster movie. Agent Lord is intended to be the time travelling Time Lord villain called the Master from the sci-fi series Doctor Who, using an alias. He refers to events from the future, from the Andromeda Strain, Night of the Living Dead, Phantoms, and Stephen King’s Desperation. He also refers to the Shoggoth from Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos. The Nyctalope is of course the French vigilante from the early 20th century. Quatermass is the main character from the British television series of the same name. Big Bad John is the main character from the song of the same name from country singer Jimmy Dean. The OSI (Office of Scientific Investigation) is mentioned here, which is in the Magnetic Monster, but also from the novel Cyborg, which became the basis for the television series Six Million Dollar Man and the spin-off Bionic Woman. All of the above mentioned series, books, and films are all shown to co-exist in the Doctor Who Universe.

1954--COLLIERS MAGAZINE “THE BODY SNATCHERS” (NOVEL BY JACK FINNEY)--Crosses: Halloween; Phantoms; Memoirs of an Invisible Man; Stephen King Universe; Scream of the Banshee; Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956 film); Return of the Living Dead; Boo; Sharknado; Airwolf; A Friend to Die For; Ben 10; Doctor Who. In Santa Mira, California, people are starting to act different. It turns out aliens are invading by slowly replacing the inhabitants and taking their forms. Unlike the film versions, in this story, there is a happy ending and the aliens are defeated. And in fact, in the Katrina Protocol (aka Voodoo Twilight), it’s revealed that the Shop (the secret government agency from Stephen King books) sent in Ohisver van Helsing to take care of the situation. The Body Snatchers will invade again, as other crossovers will bring in the 1970s remake. This novel marks the first appearance of Santa Mira, California, a fictional town that will reappear in Halloween III: The Season of the Witch, Phantoms, Memoirs of an Invisible Man, The Dark Tower, Scream of the Banshee, the first Invasion of the Body Snatchers film adaption, Airwolf, A Friend to Die For, Ben 10, Redux of the Living Dead, Boo, Sharknado and Doctor Who: The New Adventures. In separate stories, the Doctor, Nathaniel Cade, and one of the van Helsing family have all been said to have been involved in these events behind the scenes.

c. June 1, 1955--THIS ISLAND EARTH (FILM)--Crosses: Mihmiverse; The Works of Robert Rankin; Doctor Who; UHF; Borderlands; Mystery Science Theater 3000; ReBoot; Looney Tunes; A Great Moon Hoax; Arena. Aliens from Metaluna are abducting scientists to aid in their battle against another world. As with most public alien invasions or giant monster attacks, the government and private concerns are able to cover up the events. It helps that in the Doctor Who Universe, people seem almost intentionally oblivious in the face of anything beyond their normal expectations of their world. This is more of a sci-fi film, but the Metaluna Mutant from this film was considered to be part of the Universal monsters combat series in Scary Monsters Magazine. Though this is a Universal film, I still consider the Gill-Man to be the last of the famous Universal Monsters to be introduced. The Metaluna Mutant isn’t so famous, though this is still a fun film if you’re into 1950s sci-fi films. This film (and the written story it was based on) also introduces the interocitor (sometimes spelled interositer). It is an alien communication device that will appear again in Doctor Who, UHF, Borderlands 2, Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Movie, ReBoot, Looney Tunes: Back in Action, A Great Moon Hoax or, A Princess of Mars, Arena, Attack of the Moon Zombies, The Suburban Book of the Dead (Armageddon III: The Remake), and others. UHF is a comedy that can still fit realistically in the Doctor Who Universe. Borderlands is a game series that takes place on another planet. Mystery Science Theater takes place in the not too distant future of one possible alternate future. ReBoot takes place within a video game reality that is attached to the Doctor Who Universe. See the entry on Looney Tunes: Back in Action for how I explain the Looney Tunes characters in the Doctor Who Universe. Looney Tunes: Back in Action also has the Metaluna Mutant. A Great Moon Hoax is a short humorous sci-fi story by Ben Bova. Arena takes place in space in one possible future timeline. Attack of the Moon Zombies is part of a series of 1950s B style movies that are part of Christopher R. Mihm’s Mihmiverse, and now the Doctor Who Universe as well. Robert Rankin is an author who uses the device in many of his works, including The Suburban Book of the Dead. Since the device is a recurring item in his works, it brings in all of his works. This film has been referenced and spoofed many times in other films and television.

1955--FIRST FRONTIER (NOVEL BY DAVID A. MCINTEE)--Setting is 1957 and the period of the Seventh Doctor, Ace, and Bernice--Crosses: Body Snatchers. In the United States of 1957, the Doctor and his companions must deal with cold war paranoia, an alien invasion, and a regenerated Master. This novel is part of a series that continues where the original television series ends and takes place prior to the TV movie. The Doctor mentions having been involved in the events of the Body Snatchers.

1959--PREDATOR: INVADERS FROM THE FOURTH DIMENSION--A Predator hunts on the backlot of a Hollywood movie studio where a sci-fi monster movie is being filmed.

Summer 1960--TALES OF THE SHADOWMEN VOLUME 2: GENTLEMEN OF THE NIGHT--"The Melons of Trafalmadore"--The 2nd Doctor Omega tale in this volume, and thus I almost missed it. The Doctor and his companion, Hoppy Uniatz, visit the planet Trafalmadore, where Hoppy is killed. Hoppy was previously a companion of THE SAINT. Trafalmadore was previously seen in SLAUGHTERHOUSE-FIVE.

1960 to Present--CORONATION STREET--Is connected thanks to a BBC fundraising event.

1963 to Present--The events of DOCTOR WHO. Actually, the series was cancelled in 1989, then revived in 2005. This is the story of a time traveler from the planet Gallifrey who fights evil with his companions. When the Doctor, as he is called, is killed, he regenerates into a new body, with a new personality, but all the memories of his previous incarnations. In addition to the television series (that actually ended then restarted years later), there are tons of books, a play, some movies, a cartoon, and comic magazines that are all canon. For an excellent complete Doctor Who timeline, see http://www.doctorwhochronology.com/homepageold/drwhoold/intro.htm. During the later years of his adventures, the First incarnation of the Doctor was accompanied by his granddaughter Susan Foreman, Barbara Wright, Ian Chesterton, Vicki, Steven Taylor, Katarina, Sara Kingdom, Dodo Chaplet, Polly, and Ben Jackson.

1965--DOCTOR WHO--"Journey into Terror"--The Doctor encounters Doctor Frankenstein and Dracula in the episode “Journey into Terror.”

1966--DOCTOR WHO--"The Tenth Planet"--The first Doctor dies and regenerates into the Second Doctor. During this incarnation, the Doctor is accompanied on his adventures by Polly, Ben Jackson, Jamie McCrimmon, Victoria Waterfield, Zoe Herriot, and Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart.

Summer 1967--ROVER # 5--"Encounter at Night"--Number 6 is walking alone on the beach at night when suddenly the DOCTOR shows up in his TARDIS and offers to take him along as his companion. Number 6 declines, as he can't leave until he figures out the secret of the Village and destroys it.

Spring 1968--ROVER # 8--"The Quatermass Interlude"--A shooting star results in bodies turning up drained of life. John Drake, Number 6 recalls a similar incident being resolved by a PROFESSOR QUATERMASS. Quatermass is the main character of various movies and television series. Quatermass has also appeared on DOCTOR WHO.

Late 1960s--DEAD ROMANCE--The Time Lords set up a version of the Village on another planet. There are a few different possible explanations. 1) The Time Lords may have thought up the idea on their own. 2) They may have seen the TV show that the government created as a misdirection. 3) The Time Lords copied that Village as the events of the Prisoner also occur in this universe or 4) Perhaps a Time Lord had visited the Village and that is where the idea came from.

1968--STAR TREK--"Assignment Earth"--Gary Seven has a sonic screwdriver.

The era of the second Doctor--DOCTOR WHO: THE NAMELESS CITY (NOVEL BY MICHAEL SCOTT)--Crosses: Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos. The Second Doctor faces the Master! Jamie buys an old German book as a present for the Doctor. The aliens of this story are the Archons, the last of the Old Ones. The book is the Necronomicon and must be the 15th century German copy Lovecraft mentioned in “The History of the Necronomicon”. The title of this novel is also the title of the Lovecraft story that first introduced the Mad Arab Abdul Alhazred. This story also comes with the revelation that the TARDIS are cloned Old Ones!

1970--DOCTOR WHO--"Spearhead From Space"--The second Doctor dies and regenerates into the third Doctor. This Doctor was accompanied on his adventures by Liz Shaw, Jo Grant, Sarah Jane Smith, Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart, Sergeant Benton, and Mike Yates.

1970s--DECALOG--"Prisoners of the Sun"--Liz Shaw thinks of "NATO, UNCLE, NEMESIS, SHADO; all those great organizations that had inspired people in the late sixties." Clearly Liz, who works for UNIT, would know about secret government agencies in her own reality.

1972--COMEDY PLAYHOUSE--"Are You Being Served?"--The pilot for the series.

1972 to 1985--ARE YOU BEING SERVED?--This quintessentially British sitcom is about Grace Brothers, a department store in London which is owned and kept traditional, almost pre-war (e.g. precise dress code for ladies frills and gentlemen's hats according to rank), by two brothers who look old enough to have fought in the Boer war but rarely appear, as most scenes play on one floor where Mr. Cuthbert Rumbold is the executive (meaning he enjoys an endless parade of foxy but stupid secretaries) in charge of management while his dignified floor walker, Captain Stephen Peacock, has daily charge over two small sales teams. The fat and bossy, implicitly man-hungry widow Mrs. Betty Slocombe supervises the attractive Miss Shirley Brahms (with a terribly common Cockney accent) -with first choice of customers, on commission- the sale of women's clothes and accessories; the sales star at the gentleman's side is Mr. Wilberforce Clayborne Humphries...

1972 to Present--EMMERDALE FARM--In because of a connection to CORONATION STREET.

1973--DOCTOR WHO--"Verdigris"--Jo Grant, the Doctor's companion, mentions she went to spy school with Tara King of THE AVENGERS.

December 1973--THE GOODIES--"Invasion of the Moon Creatures"--The TARDIS from Doctor Who is shown in the background

March 14, 1974 - November 9, 1989--THE EUGENICS WARS: THE RISE AND FALL OF KHAN NOONIEN SINGH, VOLUME ONE (NOVEL BY GREG COX)--Series: Star Trek. Crosses: Stepford Wives; Young Frankenstein; Buffy the Vampire Slayer; Frankenstein (novel); Avengers (TV), Six Million Dollar Man; The Pretender; Beauty and the Beast (80s TV); Bionic Woman; Star Trek: The Next Generation; Modesty Blaise; Knight Rider; The Equalizer. Gary Seven is a human agent of aliens with an interest in protecting Earth from itself and Roberta Lincoln is his human assistant. A secret project has been created to engineer supermen. One particular product, Khan Noonien Singh, rises above the rest, and makes an attempt at world conquest. Gary Seven and Khan were both introduced in separate episodes of Star Trek, both having originated in the 20th century. Gary Seven’s appearance was meant to be a pilot for his own series which sadly never came to be. Khan was said to have conquered a quarter of the planet by the 1990s in the Eugenics Wars, an event that eventually of course never came to pass in the real world, so this is a wonderful story reconciling how it could have still happened without drastically altering the real world timeline from Star Trek’s history of our time period. In the story, Roberta refers to an encounter with robot housewives in Connecticut, a reference to the events of the Stepford Wives. One of the workers at the Eugenics Project is a sallow bug-eyed man called Mr. Eyegor. This is the same Igor (pronounced Eyegor) from Young Frankenstein. Another worker is Maggie Erickson, engaged to a man named Walsh, which means eventually she would take his name and become Maggie Walsh. In Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Maggie Walsh is the head of a project that creates super soldiers to capture demons, which she uses to create her ultimate super-soldier, Adam. There is also a reference to Frankenstein, as in the original version. One final issue to bring up is regarding future stories. There are several stories linked to the Doctor Who Universe that take place in the future. Doctor Who is in and this story brings in Star Trek. Alien is another linked future. Plus, there are plenty of others. But DW, ST, and Alien are the main three. And they are all pretty different in portraying how events of the future unfold. (Most of the other stories can easily fit in one of those main three timelines). I like to think of a timeline as one in which at any point, there is always a now. Looking backwards, there’s only one history. But looking forward, there is an infinite number of possibilities and thus an infinite number of future timelines, all that branch off of the present day Doctor Who Universe.

1974--DOCTOR WHO--"Planet of the Spiders"--The third Doctor dies and regenerates into the fourth Doctor. This incarnation of the Doctor was accompanied on his adventures by Sarah Jane Smith, Harry Sullivan, Leela, K-9 Mark I, K-9 Mark II, Romana, Adric, Nyssa, and Tegan Jovanka.

1975--APPARITION OF EVIL--The film is set in 2014 (when it came out), but Hendry prints out a document that states that a Mr. J. Smith and Miss R. Tyler briefly lived next door in 1975.

1975 to 1979--FAWLTY TOWERS--Inept and manic English hotel owner and manager, Basil Fawlty, isn't cut out for his job. He's intolerant, rude and paranoid. All hell frequently breaks loose as Basil tries to run the hotel, constantly under verbal (and sometime physical) attack from his unhelpful wife Sybil, and hindered by the incompetent, but easy target, Manuel; their Spanish waiter.

1976--THE SECRET FILES OF THE DIOGENES CLUB “COLD SNAP” (SHORT STORY BY KIM NEWMAN)--Series: Diogenes Club. Crosses: Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos; Carnacki Ghost Finder; Anno Dracula; Sherlock Holmes; Doctor Who (see Notes); Kim Newman’s Works; She; Sir Henry Merrivale. An extreme cold spell of Ice Age proportions threatens England and so the Diogenes Club is on the case. The Diogenes Club is a spin-off of Sherlock Holmes, who appear in their own series of stories by Kim Newman. There are a few references to Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos in the story. Carnacki and Sir Henry Merrivale are said to have attended the funeral of Mycroft Holmes, brother of Sherlock. One character in the story is able to see alternate realities, including the Anno Dracula Universe. There is also a reference to a Doctor Who story by Newman, in which the Doctor was from an alternate reality from that of the main Newman Universe (which is for our purposes the Television Crossover Universe). This raises a problem, as there has been lots of evidence provided elsewhere that the Doctor is part of the Television Crossover Universe. Doctor Who crossovers have always been a bit wibbly wobbly, whether official or unofficial. And even officially authorized stories outside the show don’t always get considered canon within the show. There are plenty of contrary Doctor Who stories that are cancelled out by later television episodes. Which means there must be several alternate but similar Doctor Who timelines. So the Doctor may exist in the Television Crossover Universe, but the Doctor from the Newman story was not the main Doctor but an alternate reality doppelganger. So, to sum up, while most stories in this chronology take place in the Doctor Who Universe, this is a rare instance in which the Doctor of the Whoniverse visits the Television Crossover Universe, where the story of this entry takes place. The Television Crossover Universe also has its own version of the Doctor, as the Television Crossover Universe’s Doctor Who book will demonstrate. This story references a massive amount of other Newman stories. The eternal blue flame from the lost city of Kor is mentioned, which is from the novel She.

October 1977--BLUE PETER--K-9 appears on this children's educational program.

October 1979--BLUE PETER--K-9 appears on this children's educational program.


1980 to 1981--ARE YOU BEING SERVED IN AUSTRALIA?--This spin-off carries characters from the original show off to work down under.

1981--DOCTOR WHO--"Logopolis"--The fourth Doctor dies and regenerates into the fifth Doctor. He is accompanied on his adventures during this time by Adric, Nyssa, Tegan Jovanka, Vislor Turlough, Kamelion, and Peri Brown.

1981--K-9 AND COMPANY--Spin-off from "Doctor Who" which, despite good ratings, didn't get past the pilot stage. One time companion to a mysterious and body-changing alien known as "The Doctor", Sarah Jane Smith returns to Earth and carries on with her journalism career. Now, in 1981, she has managed to rebuild her career and has come, a matter of days before Christmas, to her Aunt Lavinia's (a famous scientist) house in the sleepy English village of Moreton Harwood to write a book and to rest after her world-travelling assignments. However, her journalist's nose sniffs out another mystery when she arrives to find Aunt Lavinia gone, and nobody knows where she is, but the local rumour is that she was the victim of a local witch coven. Worshipers of a pagan goddess Hecate gather to celebrate a festival by ritually murdering a friend of Sarah's. She needs help... and she gets it from a box from her friend "The Doctor."...

1984 to Present--VIDEO GAMES--Game programmers/creators love Doctor Who. Doctor Who references are often hidden in video games. So often, in fact, that I chose not to list all of them. Daleks show up all over the place. The TARDIS appears and disappears on numerous occasions. Sometimes the Doctor himself will appear in various incarnations. There are even references, such as in FALLOUT: VEGAS, to very specific storylines from Doctor Who.

1984--DOCTOR WHO--"The Caves of Androzani"--The fifth Doctor Dies and regenerates into the sixth Doctor. This Doctor is accompanied by Peri Brown and Melanie Bush.

1985 to Present--EASTENDERS--A Doctor Who/Eastenders crossover aired on BBC as part of their fundraising event.

1987--DOCTOR WHO--"Time and the Rani"--The sixth Doctor dies and regenerates into the seventh Doctor. This Doctor is accompanied by Melanie Bush and Ace.

1987--SLEEPING MURDER--This is an adventure featuring MISS MARPLE. The bulk of Miss Marple stories take place in the TVCU, including the book this TV movie is based on. But this TV movie makes it in because there is a reference to FAWLTY TOWERS. This then pulls in all the Marple TV movies with Joan Hickson as the starring actress. Thus all of these are in:
  1. The Mirror Crack'd (1992) (TV) Played by Joan Hickson (as Miss Jane Marple)
  2. They Do It with Mirrors (1991) (TV) Played by Joan Hickson
  3. A Caribbean Mystery (1989) (TV) Played by Joan Hickson
  4. Agatha Christie's Miss Marple: 4:50 from Paddington (1987) (TV) Played by Joan Hickson (as Miss Jane Marple)
  5. ... aka "4.50 from Paddington" - UK (original title)
  6. Miss Marple: Nemesis (1987) (TV) Played by Joan Hickson (as Miss Jane Marple)
  7. At Bertram's Hotel (1987) (TV) Played by Joan Hickson
  8. Sleeping Murder (1987) (TV) Played by Joan Hickson
  9. A Pocket Full of Rye (1985) (TV) Played by Joan Hickson (as Miss Jane Marple)
  10. A Murder Is Announced (1985) (TV) Played by Joan Hickson
  11. The Moving Finger (1985) (TV) Played by Joan Hickson
  12. The Body in the Library (1984) (TV) Played by Joan Hickson

1987--DAMAGED GOODS--"Damaged Goods" by Russell T Davies has a crossovers to his series "Dark Season" and one of his television stories seems to share a character with "Children's ward"--Andrew Brook

1987--PREDATOR--A military unit goes into southeast Asia and encounters a Predator, who is there to hunt. See http://avp.wikia.com/wiki/Alien_and_Predator_timeline for a timeline of Aliens and Predators.

February 1988 (Contemporary Setting, maybe….see Notes)--SCOOBY-DOO AND THE GHOUL SCHOOL (ANIMATED FILM)--Scooby-Doo (1980s animated film series). Crosses: Dracula (Hanna-Barbera); Frankenstein (Hanna-Barbera); Creature From the Black Lagoon; Godzilla. Shaggy, Scooby, and Scrappy take jobs as coaches at an all-girls school that turns out to be an all-girl monsters school. Each Scooby series is taken separately for inclusion. The crosses with Godzilla and the Creature from the Black Lagoon bring in not only the 80s Scooby movies, but also the Hanna-Barbera versions of Dracula and Frankenstein. If this film were set in the time it aired, 1988, Shaggy would be in his late 30s by this point and Scooby and Scrappy would be fairly old, especially for dogs. (And with Scrappy still claiming to be a puppy.) Either the trio are immortal, or this story actually takes place in the 1970s, at a point where Shaggy is still in his early to mid 20s. As for explaining Scooby and Scrappy, see my notes on Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! on the Television Crossover Universe book. Still, this does not explain why people aren’t surprised when they encounter talking animals. I could blame it on Sunnydale-itus, the phenomenon where rational people tend to dismiss anything out of the ordinary, but this solution still leaves me slightly unsatisfied. The Dracula and Frankenstein Monster here are the Hanna-Barbera versions, likely another soul clone and copycat creation, respectively. Their daughters are on the school’s volleyball team. At the end of the film, two new students are females from the same species as both the Gill-Man (Creature from the Black Lagoon) and Godzilla. Note that there must be more than one of the Gill-Man species, and in fact, there are in-story references that state that the Gill-Man is the same as the Deep Ones of Innsmouth and the Silurians from Doctor Who. As for Godzilla, it would seem that there is also more than one of this species. In fact, in the classic series of films, it’s stated that the Godzilla from the original film was destroyed, and the one from the rest of the films was a second one. This film follows Scooby-Doo Meets the Boo Brothers and is followed by A Pup Named Scooby-Doo. This film is referenced in the 2012 Hotel Transylvania. In both animated films, the werewolf’s daughter in named Winnie.

April 1988--DOCTOR WHO MAGAZINE # 135--DEATH'S HEAD travels from his universe to the Whoniverse and meets the Doctor. The Marvel Universe is one of the settings, with links to Spider-Man and the Fantastic Four.


c. July 16, 1988--THE REAL GHOSTBUSTERS # 9 “SPENGLER’S SPIRIT GUIDE, PART 9” (MARVEL UK)--Crosses: Doctor Who; Thundercats; Combat Colin; others (see Notes). Dr. Egon Spengler explains that some UFOs are actually ghost aliens. The aliens of the story, which Spengler references as ghosts, are called the Gwanzulum. They have appeared in several titles of the Marvel UK line. In Doctor Who Magazine, they are shape shifting, mind reading aliens. Unfortunately I could only identify the above listed crossovers, but there are several sources that say they have appeared in more titles, but don’t mention which ones.

October 1988--DOCTOR WHO MAGAZINE # 141 TO 142--"Planet of the Dead"--The Doctor is on the planet Adeki, trying to fish, when he comes upon an old city of the Adekians. It is populated with metamorphic aliens. On meeting him, they take the shapes of his former companions (most of whom are dead), but then take the form of his previous selves. Andrew Brook adds: These creatures appeared simultaneously in several Marvel UK titles at the same time, but are only remembered for their face-offs with Doctor Who and Combat Colin. They seem to have been in The Real Ghostbusters as well - and John Freeman recalls they were put in Thundercats as well - possibly even others?

November 1988--TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES--"Enter: The Fly"--Baxter Stockman says "Oh no! I forgot to reverse the polarity of the neutron flow!", a reference to Jon Pertwee's most famous line

1989--PREDATOR: CONCRETE JUNGLE--A Predator hunts in New York.

1990--SEARCH OUT SCIENCE--"Search Out Space"--This children's educational program has a visit from the Doctor.

1990—Bill and Ted’s Excellent Comic Book #7--In the final part of a many-issued homage to Doctor Who’s “Trial of a Time Lord,” Bill and Ted are rescued from the literal embodiment of time by a cavalry made up of their wives, Abraham Lincoln, Genghis Khan, Billy the Kid, Napoleon, and Death. Also: all of the people who escaped Hell issues ago finally end up back where they belong.

1990--PREDATOR 2--A Predator hunts criminals in Los Angeles.

1990 - Ivan Ronald Schabloski is coerced (to keep his Vogue Rogue friends out of jail) into joining a secret branch of the military code-named the Ordnance. Ivan Schabloski completes Basic Training and upon graduation, Ivan, Blondi, and Janos move to FL. Ivan learns that while his 'official' assignment is to the Navy, the Ordinance does NOT answer to the Dept of the Navy. Ivan's first mission with the Ordinance is to assist an investigation on Amity Island of another Man-Eating shark attack, and the possibility that it is a single creature, returning from the dead on occasion to plague the locals anew. Following this assignment, Ivan is sent to New York to aid in the repair of the Statue of Liberty's torch, which houses sensitive technology damaged by the Ghostbusters on New Year's Eve 1988. The Ordnance shows up in various writings by Kevin Heim. It is analogous to other covert, military organizations such as SHIELD (Marvel Comics), Project M (DC Comics), UNIT (Doctor Who), Majestic-12 (urban legend, but used fictitiously in several movies, books, games, and television programs like DELTA GREEN and THE X-FILES), the Initiative (Buffy the Vampire Slayer), and many others. Amity Island and its Man-Eating shark(s) gained notoriety in the 1975 film JAWS (the 1974 novel that inspired the film franchise was set on Long Island NY). The idea that the Island is haunted by an undead slasher shark was presented in the 2006 comic book HACK/SLASH: TRAILERS. The Statue of Liberty's technology is a large neuralizer as seen in MEN IN BLACK II (2002). The damage to the torch was caused by the animation of the statue at the end of GHOSTBUSTERS II (1989).

April 1991--DOCTOR WHO MAGAZINE # 173 “PARTY ANIMALS” (MARVEL UK)--(Setting is era of the Seventh Doctor and companions Ace and Ria, as well as the Fourth and Sixth Doctors, but otherwise indeterminate; there is also a future incarnation of the Doctor who has not yet debuted officially)--Crosses: Doctor Strange; Captain Britain; The Simpsons; Sapphire & Steel; Star Trek: The Next Generation; Axel Pressbutton; Hulk (Comic); Fantastic Four; Timespirits; Dan Dare; Avengers (Television Series); Rocket Raccoon; X-Factor; X-Men; Sub-Mariner; Thor (Comics); Spider-Man; Conan the Barbarian; Death’s Head. The Doctor and his companions attend a birthday party on a planet within a time vortex. The future Doctor was visually based on the actor who played the Doctor in radio dramas. A later story would show the Eighth Doctor regenerate into this future Doctor, only to have been an illusion. Since this party does occur within a time vortex, we can assume each of the crossover characters came from the time period they originate from.

1991--BIG GAME--A U.S. Army soldier (and Navajo) is hunted by a Predator.

1991--COLD WAR--A Predator ship crashes in Siberia, and both the Americans and Russians hunt to obtain the technology.

Spring 1992--Bob Wronski visits New York City with friends John Barstow (once a member of the Heroes of Earth before Final Crisis and later the recording artist Johnny Bowtie) and Kenny Maxwell (formerly the supervillain Krusher before the Final Crisis). They visit the Empire State Building, legendary for the KING KONG incident as well as for being the headquarters of DOC SAVAGE. The Empire State Building is also the favorite building of architect Ted Mosby (HOW I MET YOUR MOTHER). [You may notice I can’t help but place myself in these chronologies.] The Empire State Building also connects to: LOVE AFFAIR/AN AFFAIR TO REMEMBER/SLEEPLESS IN SEATTLE, EMPIRE, PERCY JACKSON & THE OLYMPIANS: THE LIGHTNING THIEF, FAIL-SAFE, THE PRODUCERS, THE TIME MACHINE, SKY CAPTAIN AND THE WORLD OF TOMORROW, WEST SIDE STORY, STEP UP 3D, THE OTHER GUYS, INDEPENDENCE DAY, KNOWING, THE DIVIDE, DOCTOR WHO, FRINGE, MYTHBUSTERS, AVENUE Q, THUNDERBIRDS, MUCH ADO ABOUT NUTTING, MOUSE IN MANHATTAN, and EVERYTHING IS EVERYTHING. There are also literary connections, but as regular readers of my book know, I tend not to focus as much on printed material. Here is the list of films linked to the building from the building's own website: Since 1931, the Empire State Building has been an international icon and has been immortalized on the Silver Screen as a timeless classic for not only New York, but the world. As a hot destination for Hollywood, filmmakers have featured the building in more than 250 feature films to tell their tales. Some of the most memorable Empire State Building moments can be seen in "King Kong," "An Affair to Remember," "Sleepless in Seattle," "Elf," and "Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief." Others that are connected featuring the famed building are:

  • The Amazing Spider-Man
  • An Affair to Remember
  • Anchoring in Seattle
  • Annie Hall
  • Any Wednesday
  • April Fools
  • Ask Any Girl
  • Auntie Mame
  • Bachelor Apartment
  • Ball of Fire
  • Bell Book and Candle
  • Best of Everything
  • Bright Lights, Big City
  • Big City Blues
  • Blackboard Jungle
  • Bon Voyage
  • Broadway Melody
  • Butcher's Wife
  • Champion
  • Charlie Chan of Broadway
  • Come to the Stable
  • Coogan's Bluff
  • Daddy Long Legs
  • Detective Story
  • Elf
  • Easter Parade
  • Edge of the City
  • Fail-Safe
  • FBI Story
  • Fine Madness
  • Finian's Rainbow
  • Footlight Serenade
  • Fitzwilly
  • For Pete's Sake
  • French Connection I
  • Friends with Benefits
  • Funny Face
  • French Line
  • Garment Jungle
  • Guys & Dolls
  • Hancock
  • Hatful of Rain
  • How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying
  • I Take this Woman
  • Independence Day
  • It's Always Fair Weather
  • Ivory Ape
  • King of the Gypsies
  • King Kong
  • Klute
  • Kramer vs. Kramer
  • Last Action Hero
  • Law & Disorder
  • Love With a Proper Stranger
  • Lullaby of Broadway
  • Madigan
  • Man in Gray Flannel Suit
  • Manhattan
  • Manhattan Melodrama
  • Manhattan Tower
  • Moon is Blue
  • My Man Godfrey (Remake)
  • My Sister Eileen
  • New York Confidential
  • New York, New York
  • New York Stories
  • New York Town
  • North By Northwest
  • Nothing Sacred
  • Oblivion
  • On the Town
  • On the Waterfront
  • Pawnbroker
  • Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief
  • President's Analyst
  • Prisoner of Second Avenue
  • Rock Around the Clock
  • Saboteur
  • Safety First
  • Saint in New York
  • Serpico
  • Seven Ups
  • Shaft
  • Sky's the Limit
  • Slaughter on Tenth Avenue
  • Sleepless in Seattle
  • The Smurfs
  • So This is New York
  • Something Borrowed
  • Stand Up and Cheer
  • Street Scene
  • Sunday in New York
  • Superman II
  • Sweet Charity
  • The Switch
  • Taxi Driver
  • A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas
  • Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps
  • When Harry Met Sally
  • Who Done It
  • World of Henry Orient
  • World Flesh & Devil
  • You Gotta Stay Happy

1992--From James Bojaciuk There might be a Wonderland attached to the Whoniverse. I mostly resist the idea of more than two Wonderlands (Wonderland-prime and the Dark Wonderland of the Dreamlands) because 95% plus of the stories fit into one of those two worlds without any fuss. There is one story that I didn't include on my timeline (because I forgot about it) that is worth noting in relation to Doctor Who. You see, the male hero of that story is an extra-universal traveler who wears a bow-tie, dresses like an Englishman from the early part of the 1900s, and has a great mop of hair. He's mildly crazy. Personally, I can't come up with a better description of the 11th Doctor. The crazy part? This story was written in 1992.

1992--TRANCERS III--Jack Deth's phone booth-style time machine is similar to the TARDIS.

1992--THE BLOODY SANDS OF TIME--A conflict with a Predator in Nicaragua.

1992--RITE OF PASSAGE--A young Maasai boy and a young Predator face off as they both must go through a rite of passage.

1992 to 2004--ABSOLUTELY FABULOUS--Edina Monsoon and her best friend Patsy drive Eddie's sensible daughter, Saffron, up the wall with their constant drug abuse and outrageous selfishness. Numerous in-jokes and heavy doses of cruel humour have made this series a cult hit in the UK and abroad. Note that Edina and Patsy appear on ROSEANNE, but it turns out to be a dream (just like the DOOGIE HOWSER) crossover, so it's likely AbFab is a show in her universe that she is familiar with thus dreaming about it. She actually dreams about characters from TV and movies often. So Roseanne is not in the Whoniverse.

1992 to 1993--ARE YOU BEING SERVED? AGAIN!--Well, are you?

the third millennium, the early 20th century near the beginning of Word War I and the era of the Seventh Doctor with Ace and Bernice--WHITE DARKNESS (NOVEL BY DAVID A. MCINTEE)--Crosses: Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos. Voodoo, zombies, German spies, death, and something else! This story reveals that the Great Intelligence, a recurring foe of the Doctor, is Yog-Sothoth from Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos!

1993--DOCTOR WHO: DIMENSIONS IN TIME--Weird, fun, and a little embarrassing to watch at the same time. The first 3 minutes alone feature more scene-chewing than a normal Dr Who episode. In the first scene we see the evil Rani barking orders at her studly young assistant while clay heads of the late William Hartnell and the late Patrick Troughton spiral around her TARDIS console room. If that's not enough to make you think you have the DTs, we're then presented with a scene with Tom Baker's Doctor in Tetris-land kicking the OTT - meter up a notch. I still enjoyed this story, though, even if it didn't make a lick of sense. It was cool seeing all those Doctors and companions stirred together in one big mix. (Seeing the 3rd Doctor paired with Melanie and the 6th Doctor paired with Ace was bizarre). Jon Pertwee and Colin Baker in particular seemed the most enthusiastic to be involved in the project. So, if you're a Doctor Who fan, try to find this story. It has an infamous reputation, but it's well worth at least one viewing.

1993--ICON--From Salvatore Cucinotta: Just found an odd crossover with Doctor Who of all things. The Milestone comic series "Icon" is probably best known for its label as the "Black Superman", but it's a lot more than that, writer Dwayne McDuffie made it that way. Good stuff. I've finally had a chance to read it, and in issue #26, Icon returns to earth after testifying on behalf of earth, to battle the alien death-obsessed psychopath calling itself "Oblivion". He arrives on earth thanks to a "Transmat", a teleportation technology that first appeared in "Doctor Who", though here, it's a company. Looks like a pretty legitimate crossover to me, as much as any crossover with "Doctor Who" is. Here, specifically, Transmat is referred to as a company ("Thank you for traveling Transmat", but it can easily be thought of as a brand name that overtook the market (IE: Bandaids vs. Adhesive Medical Strips).

1993--GOTH OPERA--The Doctor takes on vampires in 1993. A rogue Time Lady working with the rogue vampires tells them when they ask about Dracula: "That legendary figure’s progeny all died out." Apparently, the Whoniverse had its own Dracula, who was not as long lived as the TVCU version.

1993--RACE WAR--A Predator hunts inside an Arizona State Prison.

1993--BAD BLOOD--Even among Predators there are mentally unstable psychopaths, and when one becomes a serial killer on Earth, another Predator must hunt him down.

1994 to 2009--ER-- There is wild (but fun) speculation in the Facebook Crossovers Forum that perhaps River Song spent some time on the run hiding, at which point she spent some time as Dr. Corday, and also appeared on LAW & ORDER and drove a MAGIC SCHOOL BUS full of Whoniverse counterparts of CAPTAIN PLANET'S PLANETEERS.

August 1995--INVASION OF THE CAT-PEOPLE--The Doctor runs down a list of felinoid aliens, including the Lion-Men of Mongo (Flash Gordon), the Felinoids of Cait (Star Trek), Kzinti warriors (Larry Niven's Man-Kzin Wars), and mentions that the Aegis have been known to use metamorphic cats as secret agents (Trek, again).

1995--DOWNTIME--Retired commander of the United Nations' Intelligence Taskforce, and long-time associate of the mysterious time traveler the Doctor, Brigadier Alistair Lethbridge-Stewart faces the toughest battle of his military career when he is embroiled in a plot unwittingly set in motion by university chancellor Victoria Waterfield, herself a former companion of the Doctor, to take over the Earth by an evil alien entity called the Great Intelligence, aided by its ferocious robot Yeti cohorts. Can the Brigadier defeat this menace to the Earth without the Doctor's help?

1996--DOCTOR WHO--The seventh Doctor dies and regenerates into the eighth Doctor. This Doctor is accompanied by Grace Holloway.

1996--DISCWORLD II: MORTALITY BYTES!--The Wandering Shop makes the same noise as the TARDIS when it dematerializes/re materializes.

1996--STRANGE ROUX--A Predator hunts in the Louisiana Bayou.

1996--KINDRED--A Predator returns to the same small town after thirty years to hunt a serial killer. The Sheriff would love to seek revenge against the Predator, but he too must hunt the serial killer.

1997--DOCTOR WHO MAGAZINE--”Fire and Brimstone”--The Eighth Doctor tells his companion Izzy that he’s been to DISCWORLD.

1997--CORONATION STREET: VIVA LAS VEGAS!--Mentions characters from EMMERDALE FARM.

1997--HELL AND HOT WATER--A Predator in Chili.

1997--PRIMAL--A Predator takes on Sarah Palin. (Well, the info I got said a mama grizzly bear in Alaska.)

1998--CAPTIVE--A rich evil dude holds a Predator as his captive to study.

1998 to 1999--FANTASY ISLAND--The island is still operational in this series revival, and I do consider it a revival, not a reboot. Now Mr. Roarke has gotten darker, and his appearance has changed. He is a being with supernatural powers, and this might explain things. Though Toby O'Brien has a different idea, which you can check out on his website, but that's too much speculation for me with not enough evidence to support it. It seems to me more likely that Mr. Roarke may have made some deal with some supernatural being for immortality, but the fine print said he'd be confined to Fantasy Island for life. In this new series, we learn a little more about how the Island operates. People in need accidentally stumble upon a travel agency, which books trips to Fantasy Island. Then the files are sent directly from the city to the Island via a pneumatic tube, which isn't really physically possible, so it must be magic. How are people finding this travel agency? I believe it's God, or at least the folks that work for God, whether you call them angels or white lighters or the powers that be. Whatever. In fact, perhaps Mr. Roarke is actually dead, and is serving his own penance by running the Island. Perhaps, as Thom Holbrook conjectures, all the staff from both the 70s/80s show and this one are all dead and serving their penance on the Island. Wow, pretty deep stuff. And is it possible that the travel agency is not always in the same place? That would explain how people from all over America...and the world book trips. Hey, what if Mr. Roarke was one of the angels that didn't take sides during Lucifer's rebellion, and thus this is his punishment? OK, now who's wildly speculating? But we do know that in the new series, it's been hinted that the island itself is the source of Mr. Roarke's powers, and that the longer one stays there, the more they also gain power. The staff, and Mr. Roarke's adopted daughter (raised on the island) also exhibit powers. There seems to be some hints this place is indeed some sort of Limbo dimension, with the staff all trapped there. There are parallels between the new series and Shakespeare's THE TEMPEST. One of the staff member's is named Ariel. She is a shapeshifter who is much older than she appears, and apparently may have been romantically involved with Mr. Roarke some time in the past. Note that Harry and Cal are both staff members whose lives were saved by Mr. Roarke...or perhaps their souls were. It seems that Mr. Roarke rescued them both from death, but it's implied that they actually died, and living on the Island is a way of escaping Hell. Mr. Roarke seems to have the power to send them there should they disobey him. Gordon Long also offers this take on Mr. Rourke: Recently, Kim and I watched a film with Malcolm McDowell playing Merlin. It is called Kids of the Round Table. It is set in the then present-day; released in 1997. It was filmed in Canada but seemed to be set near Albany, New York. Excalibur appears in the film. Because this predates the second Fantasy Island series, I wondered if this Merlin (and there are so, so many) became the second Roarke. Both Kim and I are convinced there are two Roarkes. Now, I don't have a problem with this second Roarke having been Merlin in the past. And it won't mess up Toby's Gallifreyan origins of Roarke, because in at least one alternate timeline---seen in the Doctor Who episode Battlefield with the Seventh Doctor, also starring Jean Marsh as Morgan Le Fay/Morgaine (who also appeared as Mombi in the Disney Return to Oz, which has a magic mirror that this Ozma was enchanted into, and evil witch Queen Bavmorda in Willow)---the Doctor himself became Merlin. So I think that the second Roarke is one of the Merlins and one of the alternate Doctors. However, you can easily interpret this Doctor/Merlin/Roarke as being all one entity. Allowing the original Roarke to be a Doctor and a Merlin explains his longevity and a possible reason why his love Elizabeth Bathory wanted to be immortal---to be with Roarke/Merlin/The Doctor forever.

1999--POWER RANGERS: LOST GALAXY--The Power Rangers (of the American version) exist in the Whoniverse. On this show, a meteor shower is said to be at the coordinates where Gallifrey should be. Given the multiversal Time War, that meteor shower could be the remains of the Gallifrey of that timeline. Gallifrey was home to the Time Lords.

1999--MILLENNIAL RITES (NOVEL BY CRAIG HINTON)--(December 31, 1999 and the era of the Sixth Doctor and Mel)--Crosses: Doctor Strange; Hellblazer; Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos; Sherlock Holmes. the Sixth Doctor and Mel arrive in London for the final New Year’s Eve Party of the century, but find the Great Intelligence has created a Y2K bug that will summon Yog-Sothoth and the Old Ones. Several elements of the Cthulhu Mythos are major story elements. This story confirms the the Great Intelligence is Yog-Sothoth. There is a mention of two characters whose descriptions are meant to invoke Doctor Strange and John Constantine. There is also a reference to the All-Consuming Fire. Like Holmes, the Doctor is a man who does not believe in the supernatural, despite encountering it plenty of times. This crossover brings John Constantine, Hellblazer, into the Doctor Who Universe.

1999--HOMEWORLD--Bad Blood Predators in Yellowstone National Park.

slightly before midnight, 31st December 1999--FUTURAMA--"The Why Of Fry"--Nibbler hides underneath the desk that Fry will sit at as the new millennium rolls in, intending to deliberately make Fry fall in the cryogenics tube, so that in the future (specifically, the episode "The Why Of Fry") he can defeat the evil brains on behalf of all intelligent life. An alternate version of Fry arrives from an alternate future in which he failed to defeat the brains. He delivers to Nibbler the dire warning, "Scootie-Puff Junior sucks!" before disappearing. The alternate Fry's interference has no lasting effect on the timeline until the events of "The Why Of Fry" in 3002 or so. The countdown to the millennium occurring at the same time all over the world is the same as the countdown in the 1996 tv movie Doctor Who.

2000--HAPPY ACCIDENTS--The film's time travel involves scientific discoveries and laws by a scientist named Blinovitch, a name which originated in the time travel law known as the "Blinovitch Limitation Effect" in multiple Doctor Who episodes.

January 2001--THE QUANTUM ARCHANGEL (NOVEL BY CRAIG HINTON)--(Setting is 2003 and between Trial of a Timelord and Time and the Rani)--Crosses: Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos; Green Lantern; X-Men. The Sixth Doctor and Mel are caught between the villains Kronos and the Master. The Master has a copy of the Necronomicon on his TARDIS. This book reveals that as a result of the events of Logopolis, the planet Oa was destroyed along with one third of the Shi’ar Empire. Though this wouldn’t work as canon for the DC and Marvel Universes, it works just fine for the Doctor Who Universe.

Winter 2003--AVP: ALIEN VS. PREDATOR--Charles Bishop Weyland leads an expedition to the Antarctic, where they find an ancient temple buried and filled with Aliens, and soon are hunted by Predators.

Winter 2003--ALIENS VS. PREDATOR: REQUIEM--Following the events of AVP, the Predators' ship crashes in Gunnison, Colorado where their captured Alien escapes and reproduces. Eventually the military blows up the town to eliminate the threat. Weyland-Yutani ends up with some alien technology.

c. May 27, 2003--SOMETHING FROM THE NIGHTSIDE (NOVEL BY SIMON R. GREEN)--Crosses: Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos; Hawk & Fisher; Elvira; Shadows Fall; Deathstalker; Doctor Who; Amber Chronicles; Thunderbirds; Michael Moorcock’s Multiverse. After five years living in mundane London, Private Investigator John Taylor takes a case that brings him back to the Nightside. The Nightside is a place that exists outside time and space, and yet connects to many times and spaces. John arrives from London via underground tunnels and a train. It’s always 3 am in the Nightside and beings from all over time and space can appear there. Additionally, it’s not uncommon to see aliens and monsters walking around like it’s no big deal. This is the first of the Nightside books, though 2001’s Drinking Midnight Wine was Green’s precursor to the series. As Taylor is travelling to the Nightside, there is graffiti about Cthulhu on the wall. The train also goes to the Street of the Gods, Shadows Fall and Haceldama. The Street of the Gods is from Green’s Hawk & Fisher series, about a strange land mixed with modern ways and sword & sorcery. Shadows Fall is another Green series, where imaginary characters are real. Haceldama is a planet which is the setting of the far future series Deathstalker by Green. At a bar, there’s a calendar with sexy pictures of Elvira. Taylor says a jukebox is the size of a TARDIS. The Amber Prince from the Amber Chronicles is seen sitting alone, wondering how he got there. The Tracy brothers from Thunderbirds are present at the bar. Also seen are the Cornelius clan from Michael Moorcock’s multiverse, another indication that his multiverse is the Television Crossover Multiverse.


2003--LOONEY TUNES: BACK IN ACTION (FILM)--Crosses: Scooby-Doo! (See Notes); This Island Earth; Fiend without a Face; Doctor Who (Peter Cushing); Forbidden Planet; Robert the Robot; The Jack Benny Program; Day of the Triffids; Invasion of the Body Snatchers; Robot Monster; Man From Planet X. When Daffy demands his own movie, he’s fired by Warner Bros. Daffy ends up causing a security guard to be fired also, and follows him home to make amends. The fired guard is the son of a famous action star who turns out to be a real secret agent, and the guard and Daffy get involved in a mission. Meanwhile, Bugs refuses to work unless Daffy is hired back, so he and the vice president of comedy head out to find Daffy. First, let me apologize to serious Doctor Who fans. However, the appearance of the Daleks brings this film into the Doctor Who Universe. The hard part for me was to explain how it could fit. Luckily, I have great friends who brought to my attention the film Evil Toons. Though some cartoon animals have been explained away as experiments of Doctor Moreau, in the case of this film, the Looney Tunes characters are clearly cartoons, but ones living in the “real world”, working for Warner Bros. and elsewhere in the world. In Evil Toons, which is in the Doctor Who Universe due to the crossover relevant to this entry, the Necronomicon ex Mortis (from Evil Dead) is used to bring cartoon characters to life, in order to serve the spell caster. Warner Bros. must have performed such a spell to bring their creations to life to serve as actors (because it’s easier?) I presume the fact that people don’t freak out when encountering living cartoons is an effect of the spell as well. It should be noted that likely all fully animated Looney Tunes cartoons are fictional within the Doctor Who Universe, but these living cartoons take on the characteristics and memories of the fictional characters they resemble. Scooby-Doo and Shaggy appear, as animated characters at the Warner Bros. cafeteria, complaining about their portrayal in the live action films. This can’t be the same Scooby and Shaggy from the 1970s and 1980s cartoons. Those cartoons feature a real person and dog (albeit a talking dog). In the 1980s, there was an animated movie called Scooby-Doo Goes Hollywood. Since the 1980s films are in the Doctor Who Universe, we can use that film as evidence that Mystery, Incorporated, and particularly Scooby, became famous. Evidently famous enough to have a cartoon and live action film based on them. The cartoon Scooby and Shaggy of this film must be from the 21st century series of new Scooby-Doo! animated films, brought to life just as the Looney Tunes figures were. Based on that, we must assume those 21st century animated films, as well, as the live action films they were complaining about, must be fictional within the Doctor Who Universe. In one scene that takes place in a lab, the film’s heroes encounter the Metaluna Mutant, a pair of Daleks, Robbie the Robot, the Fiend without a Face, a triffid, Dr. Miles J. Bennell with a Body Snatcher pod, the Robot Monster, the Man from Planet X and Robert the Robot. The Metaluna Mutant is from This Island Earth. Though the film is more sci-fi than horror, the Metaluna Mutant was included in Scary Monsters Magazine’s Universal Kombat Series, thus placing him among the ranks of the classic Universal Monsters. The Daleks are an alien race that are enemies of the Doctor from Doctor Who, but these specific Daleks were an enemy of the Doctor’s alternate universe counterpart, Doctor Who, played by Peter Cushing. Robbie the Robot is from Forbidden Planet, which takes place in the future, but as seen in Gremlins, he seems to get around through time and space. The Fiend without a Face is the creature from the film of the same name. The Day of the Triffids is a sci-film about alien plants who take over the planet. Clearly that film takes place in a divergent timeline, but may still have existed in the main Doctor Who Universe. The Body Snatchers reference is to the 1956 film, but the Doctor was involved in the original events from the novel. It would seem that the original film and novel may have been the same events. The Robot Monster is from a 1953 film of the same name. The Man From Planet X is a 1951 sci-fi film. Robert the Robot was a toy of the 1950s, though the version here is life size, as the toy was meant to be imagined as, thus this is a crossover with the fictional world that the toy lived in. Finally, the car used in the film by the security guard and Daffy is the same talking car (voiced by Mel Blanc from archived footage) from the Jack Benny Program, thus bringing that television program of classic TV into the Doctor Who Universe.

2004--EATER OF WASPS--James Bojaciuk has informed me that the 8th Doctor mentions that he met Tarzan in the novel Eater of Wasps.

November 2004--SOUTH PARK--"Something Wall-Mart This Way Comes"--in the episode The Armageddon Factor, the guardian is initially dressed much like the heart of Wal-mart, and in ep 6 he can change his form or shape at will, and appears as the president of Gallifrey not to alarm the Doctor. The Doctor acknowledges the guardian isn't who he says he is and the guardian reveals his true form.

December 2004--UNIT: TIME HEALS--The CTU (from 24) is mentioned.

c. February 22, 2005--HEX AND THE CITY (NOVEL BY SIMON R. GREEN)--Series: Nightside. Crosses: Frankenstein (all of them); The Picture of Dorian Gray; Carnacki Ghost Finder; Evil Dead; Phantom of the Opera; Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos; The Mummy (Universal); Alice in Wonderland; Maltese Falcon; Charlie and the Chocolate Factory; Casablanca; The Tempest; The Office; Shadows Fall; The Wasteland; Isaac Asimov Universe; Doctor Who; Eaters of the Dead; Moonchild; Allan Quatermain; League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. John Taylor is hired to investigate the origins of the Nightside. Taylor and his secretary dine at a restaurant that serves exotic animals including some to be from Wonderland. Wonderland of course is one of the magical realms of the Television Crossover Multiverse. The Nightside is a nexus of time and space. There is a club that caters to all the various creatures that have been created by the Frankenstein family over the years. An auction is selling Dorian Gray’s mirror. A later Nightside tale reveals it has the power to kill immortals. Taylor reveals that his mentor was Thomas Carnacki. Taylor says his phone was once possessed by Kandarian demons, which originate from Evil Dead. Below the city, a boat guide is Erik the Opera Ghost. As usual, there is Cthulhu cult graffiti on the walls of the Nightside. The Nightside uses tanna leaves as a drug. Tanna leaves were important in the Universal Mummy series. Three allegedly authentic Maltese Falcons are sold. It appears that Willy Wonka and Rick Blaine have opened establishments in the Nightside. There is a Prospero and Michael Scott Memorial Library. Prospero is from Shakespeare’s The Tempest. Michael Scott is from the American version of The Office. Michael Scott is not dead by the way. Shadows Fall is mentioned as the possible new home of a god. Nightside’s homeless live in Rat’s Alley, a reference to T.S. Elliot's The Wasteland. Also living in Rat’s Alley are robots with positronic brains, a concept first proposed in the works of Isaac Asimov. Taylor says that he learned about fighting poisons with broccoli from the travelling doctor. He’s actually referring to the fifth Doctor. Later, a flashback to the 1960s features the second Doctor and his companions. Taylor is warned about the Eaters of the Dead, a reference to a Michael Crichton novel about a Muslim abducted by vikings. Taylor is called a Moonchild, a reference to an Aleister Crowley novel about a wizard war. Another drug of the Nightside is taduki, a favorite of Allan Quatermain. In the 1960s flashback, Orlando (of the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen) is seen.

2005--JLA CLASSIFIED # 1--In the Whoniverse, Batman has a Dalek. The Batman here is Bruce Wayne Junior. Recently I decided to move the Batman and Superman vs. Aliens and Predators stories over here, and conflate them with the Christopher Reeves and Michael Keaton films. Likely the Dalek is from the Time War. Note there is also the head of the Iron Giant, placing that animated film in the Whoniverse.

2005--DOCTOR WHO--"The Day of the Doctor"--The Eighth Doctor dies and regenerates into the War Doctor. This Doctor is accompanied by the conscience of a doomsday device that takes the form of Rose Tyler, the Bad Wolf. Technically, this occurred during an unknown time at the end of the Time War, and the episode aired in 2013, but this chronology places the regenerations in a chronological order and in relation to airdates rather than in the time period, because that would be confusing.

2005--DOCTOR WHO--"Rose"--The War Doctor dies and regenerates into the ninth Doctor. This Doctor's companions were Rose Tyler, Adam Mitchell, and Jack Harkness. (The regeneration actually happened in flashback in the 2013 "The Day of the Doctor". However, this was the first appearance of the ninth Doctor.

2005--DOCTOR WHO--"The Parting of the Ways"--The ninth Doctor dies and regenerates into the tenth Doctor. This Doctor's companions are Rose Tyler, Mickey Smith, Donna Noble, Martha Jones, Jack Harkness, Astrid Peth, Sarah Jane Smith, Jackson Lake, Rosita Farisi, Lady Christina de Souza, Adelaide Brooke, and Wilfred Mott.

2005--HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY--The 2005 film version of this story is in.

2005 (and other times)--WORLD GAME--"World Game" by Terrance Dicks has the Duke of Wellington recalling promoting Richard Sharpe to an officer.--Andrew Brook

November 2005--CHILDREN IN NEED--In November 2005, Catherine Tate appeared in another sketch for Children In Need. The segment was a crossover between EastEnders and The Catherine Tate Show, featuring Barbara Windsor as Peggy Mitchell, Kacey Ainsworth as Little Mo Mitchell and Lacey Turner as Stacey Slater from EastEnders and Tate as her well-known character Lauren Cooper from The Catherine Tate Show. The sketch saw Lauren arrive in Walford in search of revenge on Stacey, who had apparently stolen her boyfriend. She appeared in the launderette in a scene with Little Mo, and in The Queen Vic in a scene with Peggy and Stacey, where she made various references to Cockney culture, such as asking Peggy whether she knew Chas & Dave.

c. February 28, 2006--SHARPER THAN A SERPENT’S TOOTH (NOVEL BY SIMON R. GREEN)--(Contemporary Setting, immediately after Paths Not Taken)--Series: Nightside. Crosses: The King in Yellow; Evil Dead; Alien; Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos; Hawk & Fisher; Doctor Who; The Water Babies; Monty Python and the Holy Grail; Alice in Wonderland; Shadows Fall; An Inhabitant of Carcosa; Alf’s Button; Fables; Adam Adamant; Eaters of the Dead; Bran Mak Morn; The Virginian; The Prisoner. As John Taylor and his friends return to the present, they find that John’s mother, Lilith, is gathering a powerful army to take over the Nightside and return it to the way she meant it to be when she created it. Apparently that’s bad. The Yellow Sign is on a bathroom wall. Taylor’s secretary is armed with a Kandarian punch dagger. Kandarian demons are from the Evil Dead series. Suzie Shooter fights using a Colonial Marine smart gun that she got from the future. At least it must be from one of the possible futures that contains the Alien film series. Lilith’s army is claimed to have wiped out the Elder Spawn (code for Old Ones), though this is not likely to be true. The train runs to the Street of the Gods, the setting of Green’s Hawk & Fisher series. There are three Doctor Who references in this one. A sonic screwdriver has been left behind the bar counter at Strangefellows. John mentions the Travelling Doctor as a potential ally and Father Time blames the Travelling Doctor for attire. It’s said that some drunk flower fairies plan on beating up some water babies. Water Babies is a story by Reverend Charles Kingsley. Taylor suggests nobody go into the basement of Strangefellows without the Holy Hand Grenade of St. Antioch. This is a reference to Monty Python and the Holy Grail. (Shame on you if you didn’t know that.) Since the Nightside touches other realities, I don’t have to explain how this Monty Python fits in with the Doctor Who Universe and Arthurian legend. But I’m going to anyways. Legend has it that Merlin himself was a temporal anomaly, aging backwards and living life in reverse, from future to past. Perhaps because of this, several divergent versions of Camelot and the Arthurian legend all existed in the same past of the Doctor Who Universe timeline. This would explain how different versions are seen in so many past stories, flashbacks, time travel tales, and modern stories. This type of reasoning may offer the same types of reasoning for the heavily magical era of fairy tales. The dormouse appears, having doorways to many realms. He claims that there were more of his kind once, but they all went away. Shadows Fall is mentioned as one of the destinations of the dormouse's doors and a train destination. Father Time appears and is from Shadows Fall. Carcosa is mentioned as behind one of the doors and as a train destination. Carcosa is from “An Inhabitant of Carcosa”. The Nightside has a store called Alf’s Button Emporium. No, this is not a reference to the cute alien who eats cats. It’s actually based on a humorous 1920 novel. Julien Advent meets fairy tale characters expelled from their homes by the Adversary. These are the fairy tale characters from the Fables comic book, making that fairy tale realm part of the Television Crossover Multiverse. This novel cements the idea that Julien Advent is Adam Adamant. The Eaters of the Dead (from the Michael Crichton novel) are said to have been wiped out by Lilith’s army. The same is said of the Worms of the Earth, who Bran Mak Morn once faced. John is attacked by a gun stolen from the grave of Dead Eye Dick, a character from the western television series The Virginian. The Collector is seen wearing the jacket of Number Six from the Prisoner. He says he also bought his car.

April 2006--BLUE PETER--K-9 appears on this children's educational program.

June 2006--THE SUITE LIFE OF ZACK AND CODY--"The Suite Smell of Excess"--Arwin's "Parallel Universalizer" is disguised as a British Telephone Booth, just like the Tardis.


2006--JUN - DEC--6/6/6: THE VOYAGE OF THE BEAST - Ivan reports on board the USS Lagos Isle on June 6, 2006, and begins a 6-month deployment that takes him to France, Italy, Cyprus, the UAE, and Bahrain. Most significant on this voyage are the two trips to France, which involved working with the French agency Félicie at a local Hangar 18 to study an egg recovered from Madison Square Gardens in 1997, and the subsequent hatching of an alien / kaiju hybrid designated a "Ginomorph". In addition to Félicie and Ordnance forces, Ivan works with the Vatican, Norway's Troll Security Service, the British DMOA, genetic engineer Luthor Praetorius (prodigy of Septimus Pretorius), anthropologist Victoria Waddell, and zoologist Misty Dawn to pursue and subdue the beast. It eludes them at the Chateau d'If and they wind up chasing it across southern Europe. They ultimately dispose of it in Mount Vesuvius near Pompeii in Italy, with help from the Blackhawks. While in Pompeii, Ivan does some research into the oldest Sator Square known to history, which was found in that location. USS Lagos Isle is named for the Pacific island where US Marines battled a dinosaur during World War 2 (from GODZILLA VS KING GHIDORAH, 1994), Félicie is from the DELTA GREEN role playing game supplements for CALL OF CTHULHU, The Ginomorph is a Whoniverse version of the creature from the American GODZILLA film (1998). The Troll Security Service is from TROLL HUNTER (2010), The DMOA is from WAITING FOR GORGO (2009). Septimus Pretorius first appeared in the film BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN (1935). Victoria Waddell is the fictional grand-daughter of an actual British explorer, Lieutenant Colonel Laurence Austine Waddell. Misty Dawn, DMV, is an original character created by Debbie Lyman, and is NOT related to the porn actress of the same name. The Blackhawks are a military aviation squadron dating back to World War Two from Quality Comics and DC Comics, first appearing in MILITARY COMICS #1 (1941). The Chateau d'If was the location where Edmund Dantes was imprisoned in THE COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO (1844-1845) by Dumas. Vesuvius and Pompeii feature in many works of fiction, including DOCTOR WHO, HIGHLANDER: THE SERIES,FOREVER KNIGHT, and BLACKWOOD FARM (a 2002 novel by Anne Rice combining her The Vampire Chronicles and The Mayfair Witches franchises).

2006 to Present--TORCHWOOD--Captain Jack Harkness, the former Time Agent and con man from the 51st century last seen traveling with the Doctor, ventures to early 21st century Cardiff. There, he becomes a member of Torchwood Institute, a renegade criminal investigation group founded by Queen Victoria to battle hostile extraterrestrial and supernatural threats.

2006--DOCTOR WHO--"Impossible Planet"--The two-part Doctor Who story "The Impossible Planet"/"The Satan Pit" features a version of the Devil referred to simply as "the Beast", who claims to have served as a subconscious basis for devil-like deities in religions throughout the universe. This depiction gives more emphasis on the monstrous appearance of the Devil, depicting him as a gargantuan, red skinned beast with horns and a skeletal face. The Torchwood episode "End of Days" features a gigantic demonic being named Abaddon, called the "Son of the Great Beast" (referring directly to the Doctor Who episodes stated above). Abaddon kills people by casting his shadow over them to absorb their life-energy, which is ultimately his downfall.

October 2006--BLUE PETER--K-9 appears on this children's educational program.

c. January 1, 2007--THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN TORC (NOVEL BY SIMON GREEN)--(Set in the summer, before the start of the Nightside series)--Series: Secret Histories. Crosses: Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos; Evil Dead; Doctor Jekyll and Mister Hyde; War of the Worlds; Nightside; Hellraiser; Frankenstein (novel). The Mystery of Edwin Drood; Doctor Who; RUR; Alice in Wonderland; Thunderbirds; Area 52 (Image Comics); Allan Quatermain; The Coming Race; Journey to the Center of the Earth; Cave Carson; Moomin; Maltese Falcon; Monty Python and the Holy Grail; Moby Dick. The Droods are a family that for a long time have been a force for good fighting supernatural evils. Edwin is one of the latest secret agent wizards, who finds himself cast out as a rogue and hunted by his own family. The date setting is based on events from future novels and the Nightside series. Green connects all of his series within one larger mythology. Edwin Drood is a wizard secret agent. Nightside exists in a pocket dimension cloaked in eternal darkness, where monsters walk around freely. The Secret Histories series has a large number of Doctor Who crosses, giving it a large presence in the Doctor Who Universe nonetheless. This novel has three Lovecraft references. A patient at a hospital for supernatural conditions is the living embodiment of every mystical tome, including the Necronomicon. There is a rumor that the Old Ones are going to rise, to which Eddie’s friend Janissary Jane dismisses as a constant rumor that will never come to pass. The conspiracy against the Droods is linked to the Lurkers on the Threshold from the Lovecraft Mythos. One of Eddie’s enemies has a Kandarian possessing amulet. Kandarian demons are from the Evil Dead series. Eddie has a confrontation with someone who has taken the Hyde formula. Martian Red Weed is seen as a drug. This is from War of the Worlds. Eddie’s witch friend Molly Metcalf talks about the Arcadia Project that turns up again in the Nightside series. The Blue Fairy finds the puzzle box from the Hellraiser series. The Droods have a scalpel once owned by Baron Von Frankenstein. Based on its significance, I’m assuming they mean Victor and not another member of the Frankenstein family. Edwin’s name is a reference to Charles Dickens’ The Mystery of Edwin Drood, with an implied family connection. At a hospital for supernatural conditions, there is a time agent whose latest regeneration had gone terribly wrong, turning him inside out. Time agents are from the Doctor Who series, and so are Time Lords who regenerate. However, typically, Time Lords are not time agents, and in fact, the two groups do not care for each other. Perhaps this was a rogue Time Lord who was recruited by the time agents. Eddie has a confrontation with an android from the 23rd century’s Rossum’s Unionised Robots. This is from the play RUR. Eddie’s grandmother suggests that Eddie court Allice Little, who “lives in a world of her own and only comes out for mealtimes. Lots of mealtimes.” This is meant to be Alice Lidell, from Alice In Wonderland, but of course can’t be the same Alice from the original story. It may still be one of the Alices who has been to Wonderland. Girls named Alice have been drawn to Wonderland for a long time. Another suggested match is Penelope Creighton, who may be related to the character named Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward from Thunderbirds. Eddie mentions a time when he broke into Area 52 in the antarctic. This seems to be a reference to the Image Comics series. The drug taduki is from the Allan Quatermain series. Vril Power, Inc. is behind the conspiracy against the Droods. Vril power is from the Coming Race. Eddie compares a trip through the sewers to the explorers who took the Journey to the Center of the Earth and to Cave Carson. The Blue Fairy also finds a stuffed Moomintroll and the Maltese Falcon. Eddie and Molly when choosing the form of their weapon, have the choice of the Holy Hand Grenade of St. Antioch. At Drood Hall is a scrimshaw carved apparently from Moby Dick.

2007 to Present--THE SARAH JANE ADVENTURES--Investigative journalist Sarah Jane Smith and her 13-year-old neighbor Maria form an alliance to combat evil alien forces. Note that Sarah Jane's uncle is famed archaeologist Indiana Smith, likely the counterpart in this reality to INDIANA JONES. If so, then the Indiana Jones films (five of them) in the Whoniverse may be inspired by Indiana Smith's exploits.

2007 to Present--BRITAIN'S GOT TALENT--Is connected thanks to a BBC fundraising event.

2007--WEAKEST LINK--K-9 is a contestant. He is the first kicked off as the weakest link despite the fact he answered all the questions correctly.

September 28, 2007--Eclectic Gypsy: An Unauthorised Biography of Dr. W WTOCHA!ho--From Matt Hickman: A book made of in universe B newspaper and magazine articles about the adventures of the Doctor. There's this: "Friends and family reacted angrily last night to reports that Rose Tyler, former of the time traveling Doctor, has been sighted operating as a high class call girl in central London. A source says "she calls herself Belle Du Jour now, but it's unmistakably Rose, even with the dark wig." But one of Rose's closest friends told us she had never heard anything so ridiculous." For a start, Rose now lives on a parallel planet in an alternate universe, so how could she be walking the streets of London? Secondly, she just isn't “that kind of girl". Which means we'll just have to keep our eyes peeled for further sightings. Wotcha! 28 September 2007. This is a reference to Billie Piper's post Doctor Who show Secret Diary of a Call Girl. Oh, and it should be noted that Wotcha! is apparently a Judoon Gossip Rag, which is funny if you know the Judoon.

2008--DOCTOR WHO # 1--”Agent Provocateur”--The Doctor takes Martha to get the greatest milkshake in the universe. They go to the Korova Milk Bar on a space station, clearly part of a franchise as the Korova Milk Bar first appeared in London in A Clockwork Orange. 2008 was the date this IDW comic was published. I’m unclear as to what time period they were in to get the milkshake, but A Clockwork Orange takes place in the near future of a dystopian timeline. This is also the era of the 10th Doctor and Martha.

August 2008--THE MIDDLEMAN--"The Clotharian Contamination Protocol"--One of the representatives from "NASA regional listening post 46A" is identified as Mr Lethbridge-Stewart. Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart was the head of the United Nations Intelligence Taskforce (UNIT) in "Doctor Who".

2008--BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER SEASON 8 # 6 (DARK HORSE COMICS)--Crosses: Doctor Who. Meanwhile, Faith, the rogue slayer, is slaying in Cleveland, where there’s another Hellmouth. The 10th Doctor and Rose Tyler appear in one panel. They are not involved in the plot and there’s no explanation for why they are there. Note that the Season 8 comic diverges into an alternate timeline due to the world exposure to vampires and slayers.

2008--MARVEL'S AVENGERS--In 2008, in the Doctor Who Universe, a group of heroes arose, and banded together, as seen in the films, in this order: CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER, MARVEL’S AGENT CARTER, HULK, IRON MAN, IRON MAN 2, INCREDIBLE HULK, THOR, CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER (intentionally listed twice), MARVEL'S THE AVENGERS, IRON MAN 3, MARVEL’S AGENTS OF SHIELD, THOR: THE DARK WORLD, CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER and GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY (thus far). The reason for the placement here is because the Avengers ends with a very public alien invasion in New York that can't work in the TVCU, and the TVCU 2 had the Cloverfield event that year, so the attack by Loki's army would be too much. However, The Whoniverse has alien invasions, and yet half the public still doesn't believe in aliens. Which matches up with the statements by a certain "man" at the end of the film who still is not a "true believer". But still, this is about crossovers? How can I link this to Doctor Who? Well, in Captain America, there is a reference to the events of Raiders of the Lost Ark, but no mention of Indiana Jones. In the Doctor Who Universe, Sarah Jane Smith's uncle is Indiana Smith, whose life mirrored Indiana Jones, and thus I place the Marvel Cinematic Universe are part of the Whoniverse.

2008—MY LITTLE PONY: FRIENDSHIP IS MAGIC--“Friendship is Magic” parts 1 and 2--So. This is a show about magical ponies who go on magical adventures. This is the pilot. Here, Twilight Sparkle and her secretary midget-dragon (*sigh* baby-dragon) Spike travel to the city of Ponyville for the grand festivities. Things go wrong. An evil-princess, Nightmare Moon, returned from her exile on the moon and engaged in an attempt to take over all the world and plunge it into darkness. By the end of the episode, of course, she reforms and becomes the friendly Princess Luna. Doctor Whooves appears in the background several times. Knowing him, he likely had a vital hand—er, hoof—in insuring this adventure had a happy ending. Who is Doctor Whooves, you ask? He’s the Doctor. The Tenth Doctor, to be exact. It seems that while he was running from his impending death he ended up in a particularly devilish alternate universe. It was filled with magical ponies. He stayed there—is staying there—for a number of years before continuing on to “The End of Time.” Previous incarnations of the Doctor have also appeared in various places in Equestria (why is this a word Microsoft Word recognizes as real?). They will be noted as they appear. Doctor Whooves began as an ordinary pony that the fans latched on to and granted the name "Doctor Whooves" because of his accidental resemblance to David Tennant. At some point the production studio seems to have thought this was a grand idea and began to incorporate other incarnations of the Doctor. (Doctor Whooves is increasingly being presented in marketing materials. I hate to admit this, but if they make a pony doll of the Doctor, I will buy it.) Twilight Sparkle’s “cutie mark” may be a crossover with Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. [This entry is an excerpt from James Bojaciuk’s My Little Pony book post, the most viewed post on the Television Crossover Universe website.]

2008—MY LITTLE PONY: FRIENDSHIP IS MAGIC--“The Ticket Master”--Doctor Whooves appears again.

2008—MY LITTLE PONY: FRIENDSHIP IS MAGIC--“Applebuck Season”--Doctor Whooves really likes showing up in the background.


c. December 30, 2008--THE UNNATURAL INQUIRER (NOVEL BY SIMON R. GREEN)--Series: Nightside. Crosses: Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos; War of the Worlds (novel); Doctor Jekyll and Mister Hyde; Elvira; Doctor Strange; Doctor Druid; The Wicker Man; The Addams Family; The Mummy (Universal); 2001: A Space Odyssey; Lassie; Doctor Who; Get Smart; James Bond; The Avengers (TV); Shadows Fall; Maltese Falcon; Star Trek. A man claims to have proof of the afterlife on DVD, and the Nightside’s top rag hires John Taylor to find him and the DVD. It’s not unusual for the Nightside stories to have Lovecraft references, and this one has at least five that my Nightside researcher John D. Lindsey Jr. has found. The character Harry Fabulous has access to the drug Martian Red Weed from War of the Worlds. He also has a version of the Hyde formula. This wouldn’t be the first story to see the Hyde formula as a street drug. In an old issue of the Inquirer is a story of Jacqueline Hyde, one of Henry’s descendants, who was in love with her male alter ego of Mister Hyde. In an interesting twist, the film Dr. Jekyll and Ms. Hyde features a male descendant of Jekyll who transforms into a beautiful but evil female Hyde. A personal ad in the Inquirer reads “Desperately Seeking Elvira”. Seen gathered in conference are the Travelling Doctor (Doctor Who), the Strange Doctor (Doctor Strange) and the Druid Doctor (Doctor Druid). “The Collector” has “the Wicker Man” with dead police officer inside. At the bar is a living active disembodied hand, most likely Thing from the Addams Family. A drink at the bar is Mummy’s Favorite, with tanna leaves as the main ingredient. Another old Inquirer article mentions the monoliths on the moon (from 2001: A Space Odyssey). The newspaper has a personal ad that reads “Lassie come home, or the kid gets it”. At a bar, Taylor compares a jukebox to the TARDIS. Three secret agents matching the descriptions of Maxwell Smart (Get Smart), James Bond, and John Steed (The Avengers) are seen comparing gadgets. There is a train that goes to Shadows Fall. Reporter Betty Devine wonders if “the Collector” has the Maltese Falcon. Also at the bar is what appears to be a tribble from Star Trek.

February 2009 to November 2010--LAW & ORDER: SPECIAL VICTIMS UNIT--"Transitions/Crush/Wannabe/Trophy"--There's a new defense attorney, named Miranda Pond. In the DOCTOR WHO UNIVERSE, there is a time traveler with a long lifespan named River Song, though she was born Melody Pond. River spent some time trying to hide from the authorities of her universe, and her husband, the Doctor, himself spent centuries doing the same thing, and certainly could have showed her how to stay hidden. Don't even get me started on THE MAGIC SCHOOL BUS.


c. June 3 - October 9, 2009--FOREVER JANETTE (WEBCOMIC)--(One setting is 1348 and the era of the fifth Doctor and the other is contemporary and the era of the eighth Doctor). Series: Doctor Who; Forever Knight. While the fifth Doctor is in 1348 meeting Knight, in the present, the eighth Doctor works with Knight on a follow-up to their previous encounter. Not all web comics meet the criteria for consideration for this book. Because anyone can post anything online, I’m choosy in order to avoid inclusion of fan fiction. However, this book has included some webcomics and other web content, when there is something to separate it from fan fiction. Some examples would be if the writer/artist was paid for the work or if the work was later reprinted in a book or trade paperback. Other examples would be if the web comic characters cross with a series of a more traditional format or if the web work is an official extension of a more traditionally formatted work. In this instance, the author of the work, Rich Morris, has also written another web comic which crossed Doctor Who with Jem. Though truly outrageous, and I mean truly, truly, truly outrageous, the creator of Jem and the Holograms stated that she considered the story as canon. Since that was considered canon for Jem, that pulls Morris’ Doctor Who webcomics out of fan fiction and validates inclusion of this web comic in the Doctor Who Universe.

2009--IRIS WILDTHYME AND THE CELESTIAL OMNIBUS--Iris Wildthyme, a character who originates in the Doctor Who Universe, travels for further adventure where she meets El Santo, now calling himself Senor 105.

2009 to Present--K9--New adventures of the very powerful robot dog. For more on K-9, see his entry at the TARDIS Wikia.

2009 to present--COMMUNITY--At some point, someone who met the Doctor must have decided to create a show based on him, called Inspector Spacetime. Likely the sidekick Reggie is based upon a companion of the Doctor, perhaps the one who created the show.

October 30 to 31, 2009--FOREVER AUTUMN--Apparently in the Whoniverse, there is a counterpart to Jar Jar Binks with great telepathic abilities, so great that he connected with George Lucas, giving him the idea for the character. In the Whoniverse, Jar Jar was inspired by a real creature.

c. December 29, 2009--JUST ANOTHER JUDGEMENT DAY (NOVEL BY SIMON R. GREEN)--(Contemporary Setting, likely just after The Unnatural Inquirer)--Series: Nightside. Crosses: Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos; Frankenstein (see Notes); Frankenstein (all of them, every version); The Picture of Dorian Gray; Shoggoth’s Old Peculiar; Them!; Creature from the Black Lagoon; Doctor Jekyll and Mister Hyde; Doctor Who; Secret Histories; Doctor Syn; Solomon Kane; Deathstalker; Beowulf. The Walking Man is the embodiment of the wrath of God and he has come to the Nightside. Nightside’s new authorities hire John Taylor to stop him. The Walking Man is shown to be so powerful that he can easily destroy a Lovecraftian horror while walking down the street without even slowing down. (I guess God trumps Cthulhu after all.) Shoggoth’s Old and Very Peculiar appears again. Zhang the Mystic, a member of the Adventurer’s Club, is said to have battled Elder Gods. John Taylor and Suzie Shooter fight an evil Victor Frankenstein from a mirror universe. This is not the same Victor Frankenstein from the main Doctor Who Universe timeline. Taylor mentions that Frankenstein is a common name in the Nightside and that he has encountered many of Victor’s descendents and their creations. This supports my theory (adapted from the theories of Mark Brown and Chuck Loridians) that many of the Frankensteins and monsters seen in fiction are Victor’s family and their numerous monsters, rather than always being the same Victor Frankenstein and one single monster. The mirror Victor finds a way to control the citizens of the Nightside by learning that the actions of people in one reality dictates the actions of their doppelgangers. Taylor compares this to Dorian Gray’s picture, where Dorian’s actions are reflected within the portrait. The sewers of the Nightside have giant ants, like those from the film Them! The Adventurer’s Club has a stuffed Creature from the Black Lagoon. Jacqueline Hyde is at the Adventurer’s Club. In the previous Nightside novel, she was mentioned in the Unnatural Inquirer as being in love with her male Hyde alter ego. There is an old Victorian drinking song called “Dr. Jekyll’s Locum”. One of Suzie’s neighbors is Sarah Kingdom, a character who first appeared on Doctor Who during the first Doctor’s run. Janissary Jane, a character from Green’s Secret Histories, appears at the Adventurer’s Club. The Walking Man mentions the Drood family from Secret Histories. Past members of the Adventurer’s Club include Dr. Syn, Salvation Kane (likely meant to be Solomon Kane) and Owen Deathstalker from Green’s futuristic sci-fi Deathstalker series. At a gun shop is the Darkvoid Device, also from the Deathstalker series. (Remember that the Nightside exists outside normal time and space.) The Adventurer’s Club also has an arm of Grendel, who was slain by Beowulf.

January 2010--BETTER OFF TED--"The Great Repression"--A Dalek is in the storage room Lem and Phil enter to find their cleaning robot Chumley.

April 24, 2010--HAPPY ENDINGS--The Seventh Doctor's former companion Bernice is getting married, and the Doctor brings Sherlock Holmes and Watson from 1887 to attend.

c. June 1, 2010--THE SPY WHO HAUNTED ME: A SECRET HISTORIES NOVEL (NOVEL BY SIMON R. GREEN)--(Contemporary Setting, between Nightside novels Sharper than a Serpent’s Tooth and Hell to Pay)--Crosses: Nightside; Doctor Jekyll and Mister Hyde; War of the Worlds (novel); Gravel; Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos; The Monkey’s Paw; Hellraiser; Frankenstein (many of them); Stephen King Universe (the works of Stephen King); The Coming Race; Excalibur (Marvel Comics); Wizard of Oz; Shadows Fall; I Dream of Jeannie; Doctor Who; Wolf of Kabul; Maltese Falcon; Doom Patrol; The Time Machine; Chronicles of Narnia; Lone Ranger; Area 52; The Men Who Stare at Goats; A Midsummer’s Night's Dream; The Avengers (television). Many of the Drood agents compete in a competition where the prize is the knowledge of a legendary past agent. There are numerous references to Green’s other series, the Nightside. Harry Fabulous appears, selling the Hyde drug and Martian Red Weed. Later, the agents battle a user of the Hyde drug. It’s mentioned that the War of the Worlds Martians once attempted to invade the Nightside. The Tower of London is guarded by SAS Combat Sorcerers, who come from the Gravel series. There is an appearance of two of Pickman’s paintings from Lovecraft’s Pickman’s Model. There is a mummified Monkey’s Paw. A puzzle box (from the Hellraiser series) appears. There was a factory in Cuba using Frankenstein monsters as slave labor. Later, several of the monsters are seen doing karaoke in the Nightside. A representative of Vril Power, Inc. appears. There is also a representative from MI13. This agency comes from the Excalibur comic from Marvel Comics. Eddie Drood is familiar with the existence of Oz. Shadows Fall is mentioned and indicated to exist in the far future of the Green Universe. However, many Green stories also have Shadows Fall interacting with other realms in the present and Shadows Fall is a reality of characters who are imaginary in the “real world”. In fact, Shadows Fall may be the same realm also called the Land of Fiction and Imaginationland. Likely time is irrelevant in that realm and exists in all times at once in relation to the Doctor Who Universe. One of the Droods mentions Jeannie from I Dream of Jeannie. The Travelling Doctor is mentioned. Doctor Who? The Wolf of Kabul is also mentioned. He is a character from a military themed comic of the same name. There’s another reference to Green’s favorite thing, the Maltese Falcon. There is an appearance of the Painting that Devoured Paris from Grant Morrison’s run on the Doom Patrol. A stuffed Morlock appears. Eddie is familiar with the talking beavers of Narnia. Eddie’s ally Honey wonders why the Lone Ranger really used silver bullets, implying that Tonto knew of their use against the supernatural. Area 52 is mentioned. There is a reference to a U.S. government project training soldiers to be psychics, including walking through walls and knocking over goats. This is a reference to the film The Men Who Stare at Goats. Eddie has a history with the elf Peaseblossom from A Midsummer’s Nights Dream. The Droods keep watch over Crouch End Towen from Stephen King’s Crouch End. The Nightside’s Walker uses a sword cane which he claims to be a British spy tradition. Of course he’s referring to John Steed of the Avengers.

2010--PREDATORS--Predators steal humans from Earth that are all trained killers in order to hunt them on a jungle planet. (Includes a comic prequel.)

August 2010--EUREKA--"Stoned"--Zane Donovan asks Lupo and Fargo if he should get the TARDIS blueprints from the pentagon

2010 to Present--MY LITTLE PONY--Before his "death", the 10th Doctor travels to the Pony Universe and is transformed into Doctor Whooves. (Don't look at me. You can blame James Bojaciuk for finding this one that actually counts.) Read about all his adventures there on the Television Crossover Universe website.

2010--DOCTOR WHO--"The End of Time"--The tenth Doctor dies and regenerates into the eleventh Doctor. This Doctor's Companions are Amy Pond, Rory Williams, River Song, Craig Owens, and Clara Oswald. In the space bar scene, one of the aliens recites the same alien words that can be heard by an alien in the bar on Mos Eisley in Star Wars. Apparently common bar talk for whatever language that is amongst scoundrels. I believe Star Wars to be in the Whoniverse.

2010--EASTENDERS/CORONATION STREET--"Children in Need"--This happened.

2010 to Present--SHERLOCK--James Bojaciuk had found this: The TARDIS appeared on a recent episode of Sherlock, which implies that the Benedict Cumberbatch version of the character is the Holmes of the Whoniverse; as several of the Doctor Who novels have stated that Holmes is the fictional creation of Conan Doyle, perhaps Sherlock was named after the fictional character. Ted Gregory has also pointed out that a book from DOCTOR WHO has also appeared in this series. Moffat on Twitter: "Sue says that isn't the TARDIS, it was a lighting thing. But by my cuff links, what ELSE could it be???"

December 2010 (and the 44th Century and 1952)--DOCTOR WHO--"Christmas Special"--The Doctor calls Father Christmas "Jeff". If there's one Santa for the Television Crossover Multiverse, then likely he is the same guy over in the Whoniverse, being one of the very few really magical beings able to exist there.

c. June 7, 2011--FROM HELL WITH LOVE: A SECRET HISTORIES NOVEL (NOVEL BY SIMON R. GREEN)--Crosses: War of the Worlds (novel); The Crystal Egg; Nightside; Suspiria; Carnacki Ghost Finder; Ghost Finders; Doctor Faustus; Evil Dead; Frankenstein (novel); Frankenstein (Universal); Frankenstein (and some others): Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos; The Man from UNCLE; James Bond; Shadows Fall; Doctor Who; Indiana Jones; I Dream of Jeannie: Solomon Kane; Area 52. The Droods battle Doctor Delirium and the Immortals over the Apocalypse Door. An auction is selling a Martian Tripod and a Crystal Egg. This novel has several references to Green’s Nightside series. An auction attendee is Aunt Sally Darque, who was banned from every coven in Europe after that nasty affair at the dance academy in the German Black Forest. This is a reference to the film Suspiria. The Carnacki Institute is mentioned. Doctor Faustus is former owner of the Apocalypse Door. Archie Leech’s Kandarian Amulet is mentioned. The immortals are residing in Castle Frankenstein. The Droods are assisted by the Bride of Frankenstein and several other Frankenstein Monsters in taking the castle. In the Antarctic, Eddie sees a bizarre alien city within a mountain. This is likely a reference to At the Mountains of Madness, considering Green’s habit of throwing in a Lovecraft reference in every story. The war is compared to the rivalry between UNCLE and THRUSH or between James Bond and SPECTRE. Green also references his other series, Shadows Fall, a few times. At Drood Hall, there are several 19th century family members still alive because their aging was slowed during the Time War. Yes, Whovians, it’s likely that Time War, considering that Green tends to throw in at least one Doctor Who reference in each of his stories. Isabella Metcalf is compared to Indiana Jones. Jeannie (of I Dream of…) is listed among the immortals. There is a dead dragon under Castle Frankenstein, perhaps a reference to the Solomon Kane adventure, The Dragon of Castle Frankenstein. Eddie and Molly travel to Area 52 to stop the villain.

2011—MY LITTLE PONY: FRIENDSHIP IS MAGIC--“Hearts and Hooves Day”--The Doctor is seen with Derpy Hooves in this episode, which may indicate that the “Doctor Whooves and Assistant” internet radio shows are considered canon by the production staff. Some fans feel this is so; others disagree; flame wars ensue. (Some use this as evidence that the Doctor is in a romantic relationship with Derpy. I'm not going to consider this.) Regardless, the episodes are enjoyable—and entirely about the Tenth Doctor, so, for the moment, it seems logical to consider them some form of canon. [All pony related entries in this chronology are excerpts from James Bojaciuk’s extremely popular My Little Pony book post on the Television Crossover Universe website.]

c. October 12, 2011 - January 12, 2012--LEGION OF MONSTERS # 1 - 4 (MARVEL COMICS)--Crosses: Morbius the Living Vampire; Bloodstone; The Living Mummy; Creature from the Black Lagoon; Werewolf by Night; Tomb of Dracula; Son of Satan; Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Elsa Bloodstone learns that not all monsters are evil and that some fight for good. The Legion of Monsters was a team of Marvel’s monsters that first appeared in 1976. The original team members were Morbius, Werewolf by Night, Ghost Rider, and Man-Thing. The current team members from this series are Morbius, Bloodstone, the Living Mummy, Manphibian, and Werewolf by Night. Morbius originated as an enemy of Spider-Man. Manphibian originated from the original Legion of Monsters series, as Marvel’s take on the Creature from the Black Lagoon. The Manphibian is an alien, but so may be the Gill-Man, who was conflated with the Silurians of Doctor Who in League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. Jack Russell is the Werewolf by Night. Dracula also appears, and is of course the Marvel version from Tomb of Dracula. Also appearing is Damon Hellstrom from Marvel’s Son of Satan. This story brings Son of Satan into the Doctor Who Universe. Finally, Jack Russell refers to a doorway to Hell as a Hellmouth, a term that originated on Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

December 2011--A CHRISTMAS CARD FROM THE MIDDLEMAN--This is a fanfic piece crossing Doctor Who with the Middleman. And you're right that I don't include fan fiction. Only in this case, the author of this piece is the guy who created the Middleman, making this canon.

c. December 27, 2011--A HARD DAY’S KNIGHT (NOVEL BY SIMON R. GREEN)--(Contemporary Setting, immediately after the Good, the Bad, and the Uncanny)--Series: Nightside. Crosses: Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos; Creature from the Black Lagoon; King in Yellow; Hawk & Fisher; 1408; Frankenstein (all of them); The Enquiries of Doctor Eszterhazy; The Wicker Man; Secret Histories; Shadows Fall; The Door in the Wall; The Teletubbies (no, you didn’t misread); Fafhrd and the Grey Mouser; Alice in Wonderland; Doctor Who. John Taylor receives the legendary Excalibur in the mail and decides to deliver it to the descendants of the original Knights of the Round Table who reside in London. Along the way, Taylor finds himself in a dark mirror universe where England is called Albion and Merlin chose a different path and became the Anti-Christ. Like most of the Nightside stories, this one is loaded with numerous Lovecraft references. Taylor passes a sushi stall run by “something from a black lagoon”. There is graffiti in the Nightside that includes the Yellow Sign from the King in Yellow. The train runs to Haven from Green’s Hawk & Fisher series. Hawk and Fisher themselves also appear in the story. In the mirror reality, King Arthur hides in room 1408 of the castle. At a bazaar, there is tattooing using Frankenstein blood. I’m not sure if this means the blood of a Frankenstein or a Frankenstein monster. Previous Nightside stories have confirmed that many of the Frankenstein family have created numerous monsters, thus confirming one of the major crossover connection rules of the Doctor Who Universe. In the mirror reality of Albion, the streets are lined with Wicker Men filled with dead men. Green again makes numerous references to his Secret Histories series. The Nightside train also runs to Shadows Fall, as also seen in previous Nightside stories. Shadows Fall is another Green series. The only entrance to the castle of the knights is a green door, which may be a reference to H.G. Wells’ The Door in the Wall, in which a green door is a portal to a magical garden. At the bar called Strangefellows, there are four fuzzy little creatures with working televisions implanted in their stomachs. These would be the Teletubbies. They are said to be post-nuclear apocalypse mutants. Thus, we may assume that the Teletubbies exists in one possible alternate timeline of the Doctor Who Universe. The Nightside exists outside of time and space, so it’s easy for visitors from other time periods to show up. John and his partner Suzie pass the Bazaar of the Bizarre from the Fafhrd and the Grey Mouser series. John and Suzie visit the dormouse. The dormouse has several doors that work as portals to other places, including Shadows Fall and Carcosa. Carcosa is a city that once existed. It is mentioned in the King in Yellow, though it’s first literary appearance was in Ambrose Bierce’s 1891 “An Inhabitant of Carcosa”. The fictional city may have been inspired by a real city, Carcassonne (Carcaso in Latin), that was in medieval France. There is also a door to Scytha-Pannonia-Transbalkania from Avram Davidson’s The Enquiries of Dr. Eszterhazy. Taylor mentions that his portable timeslip only works in time and space but not dimension. He adds that it’s not a TARDIS.

2012--SO YOU CREATED A WORMHOLE (NOVEL BY PHIL HORNSHAW & NICK HURWITCH)--Series: The Time Travel Guide--Crosses: Evil Dead; Alien; Terminator; Doctor Who; Back to the Future; Forbidden Planet; The Time Machine; Time Cop; A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court; Star Trek; Timeline; Stargate; Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure; Hot Tub Time Machine; Star Wars; Futurama; Donnie Darko; Time After Time; Lost; Philadelphia Experiment; 12 Monkeys; Quantum Leap; X-Files; Gundam; Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers; Voltron; iRobot; Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy; Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (films); Superman (Christopher Reeve films); Land of the Lost; Battlestar Galactica; Star Trek (reboot); Planet of the Apes; Call of Duty; Muppet Show. Not so much a story, this is an actual guide for new time travellers written by some guys who live at some point in the future, but who came back in time to publish the book (presumedly to avoid an amateur time traveller from screwing up their timeline). This story implies that all of the above crosses exist. However, because of the nature of time travel, it’s possible that some of the above may be in divergent timelines while others are part of the main Doctor Who Universe timeline.

2012--SIGHTSEERS--We see the iconic TARDIS at the Crich Tramway Museum.

c. April 13, 2012--CABIN IN THE WOODS (FILM)--Crosses: Alien; Half-Life; Evil Dead; Poltergeist; Frankenstein (Universal); Child’s Play; Creature from the Black Lagoon; Corpse Bride; Killer Klowns from Outer Space; Stephen King Universe; Killjoy; Devil’s Rejects; Clownhouse; Drive Thru; Funhouse; Amusement; Circus of Fear; Clown Camp; Demonic Toys; Demons; Night of the Demons; Supernatural; Charmed; Gremlins; Ghoulies; Creeps; Troll; Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; Frankenstein (novel); Dr. Giggles; The Human Centipede; House on Haunted Hill; The Dead Pit; Buffy the Vampire Slayer; The Strangers; Underworld; Attack of the 50 Foot Woman; Troll Hunter; Anaconda; Python; Mega Snake; Snakes on a Plane; Resident Evil; Hellraiser; Cannibal Holocaust; Creepshow; Legend of Sleepy Hollow; Attack of the Jack-O-Lanterns; Pumpkinhead; Frankenfish; The Mummy! Or a Tale of the Twenty-Second Century; The Mummy (Universal); The Hills Have Eyes; Wrong Turn; Chernobyl Diaries; 28 Days Later; Signal; the Works of Quentin Tarantino; Left 4 Dead; Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos; Re-Animator (film); Siren; The Exorcist; The Exorcism of Emily Rose; Reptilicus; Jurassic Park; Abominable Bigfoot; The Legend of Boggy Creek; Ape Canyon; Curse of Bigfoot; Night of the Bloody Apes; Wendigo; Night Beasts; Night of the Scarecrow; Scarecrows; Husk; Scarecrow Gone Wild; The Scarecrows Walk at Midnight; The Town that Dreaded Sundown; The Craft; Witches of Eastwick; Hocus Pocus; Jack Frost; Hellboy (film); Rumplestiltskin; Leprechaun; Hansel and Gretel Witch Hunters; Gingerbread Man; The Vampyre; Dracula (novel); Nosferatu; The Wolf Man; An American Werewolf in London; The Howling; Wolf; Texas Chainsaw Massacre; Friday the 13th; Night of the Living Dead; Return of the Living Dead; F.E.A.R.; The Blob; Feast; Horrors of the Wendigo; Frostbiter; Ghost; Bram Stoker’s Dracula (film); The Cyclops; Cyclops Giant; Nightbreed; Leeches!; Attack of the Giant Leeches; Rows of Teeth; The Birds; Killing Birds; Birdemic: Shock and Terror; Silent Hill; Attack of the Killer Lane Gnomes; Alligator; Lake Placid; Them!; Legion of Fire: Killer Ants!; Ants; Empire of the Ants; King Kong; Centipede Horror; The Giant Claw; The Ring; Attack of the Giant Gila Monster; The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms; Tarantula; Eight Legged Freaks; Jaws; Frogs; Lord of Darkness; House of the Dead; The Grudge; Chopping Mall; BlinkyTM; The Kraken; Kraken: Tentacles of the Deep; Octopus; The Beast; Deep Rising; It Came From Beneath the Sea; Tentacles; Eye of the Beast; Mega Shark; Giant Octopus; Castle Freak; Tokyo Gore Police; Septic; Mutants; Ogre; Blood Pool; Legend of the Ogre; Killing Floor; Little Shop of Horrors; The Breed; Hatchet; Phantasm; See No Evil; Thinner; Monster House; Attila; Dead Snow; Frankenstein’s Army; Manhunt; The Monster in the Closet; Killer Eyes; Demomata; CSP-682; Parasite Eve 2; Dead Space; Night of the Lepus; Creature from the Haunted Sea; Tremors; Hostel; The Collection; The Butcher; Dead Rising; My Bloody Valentine; The Exterminator; Willard; War of the Worlds; Signs; Lollipop Chainsaw; Ghost Ship; Curse of the Pirates; Jolly Roger; Lead Soldiers; Vampire Vikings; The Witch; Blair Witch Project; The Village; The Thing; Vampire Breath; Goosebumps; Angel; King Cobra; Harry Potter; Wizard of Oz; Great Expectations; Batman; Labyrinth; Land of the Giants; The Wrath of Paul Bunyan; Dreamscape; Last of the Mohicans; Blood Meridian; Scalps; Savage Sam; Sin City; Kevin Spencer; We Need to Talk About Kevin; Jacob’s Ladder; Doctor Who; Black Swan; Pan’s Labyrinth; Nutcracker; Blade Hunter; The Chronicles of Narnia; Time Bandits; The Princess and the Frog; Pirates of the Caribbean; Futurama; The Incredible Shrinking Man; Pee-Wee’s Playhouse; Red Planet; Terminator; Zathura; Hardware; Robot Wars; Bacterial Contamination; Firefly; Clash of the Titans; Team Fortress; Man from Planet X; Starship Troopers; Silence of the Lambs/Hannibal; Twisted Metal. A group of teens head out for a weekend in a cabin in the woods, not knowing that they have been chosen as sacrifices to an ancient deity in order to save the world from his wrath. This film exposes the secret truth behind modern horror. Behind it all is a secret organization, chosen to sacrifice youth to ancient gods. All of the above named crossovers have been linked in this film, and revealed to be part of this secret conspiracy. Most of the crossovers above come from the monsters and artifacts contained in the facility. While some of the monsters and artifacts are clearly from certain films above, many are based on certain types of horror films, in which case I included the more well-known of these film types. I recommend the well-researched Cabin in the Woods Wiki for a more detailed listing of the monsters and their inspirations. Note that I included in the above crossovers some monsters that only appeared in the official novelization and the official Universal Theme Park attraction tie-in. With this film, I break one of my major rules of crossover connecting. Though some of the crosses are direct crosses, like Evil Dead and Left 4 Dead, most of them are only connected because the films represent the more well-known films of the trope from which a certain monster comes. Normally, I would not count something that is “like something from”, but there is dialogue within the film that makes me break my rule. In one scene, referring to the monsters, security officer Daniel Truman says “They’re like something from a nightmare.” Lin, a head scientist, responds, “No, they’re something nightmares are from.” She goes on to explain that these monsters are the creations of the Ancient Ones, having been around since the beginning, and different cultures have told stories that interpret them in different ways. Thus, in the instance of this film, “like” is enough because of the author’s intent. And thus my love/hate relationship with Joss Whedon, for expanding the Doctor Who Universe dramatically but making me do a lot of work to write this entry. Note that this film ends with the start of an apocalypse, so the end must veer into a divergent timeline. We must presume in the main Doctor Who Universe, the virgin shot the fool. And if you haven’t seen the movie, that last sentence probably seems very bizarre. This film has been referenced as fictional in South Park, The Cinema Snob, Scary Movie 5, and Doc of the Dead. It is also paid homage to in Red Dawn when Chris Hemsworth and his friends once more wind up in a cabin in the woods. The film has also been spoofed in Robot Chicken and Scary Movie 5.

2012--JUN-JUL--WAVERLY HILLBILLIES - A scientific study gone awry causes haunted hospital Waverly Hills to expand across the city of Louisville, thanks to the machinations of former time agent John Hart, who wished to create a singularity using a Lament Configuration and a Vortex Manipulator. Ivan works with the Vogue Rogues, the Louisville Ghostbusters, the Western Kentucky Ghostbusters, the Monster Squad, the (5th) Doctor, Sheriff Jack Carter, FBI agent Kevin Lynch, and the aforementioned Captain John Hart to push the paranormal tesseract back inside itself and stave off the infernal beings attempting to break through. Waverly Hills Sanatorium is a haunted hospital in Louisville KY and has been featured on tv series like Family Channel's Scariest Places On Earth and Syfy's Ghost Hunters, as well as French comic book PANDEMONIUM and horror film DEATH TUNNEL (2005). The Vogue Rogues are part of Ivan's supporting cast. The Louisville Ghostbusters and the Western Kentucky Ghostbusters are franchises of GHOSTBUSTERS (1984). FBI Agent Lynch is from the series CRIMINAL MINDS (2005). Captain John Hart is from series 2 of TORCHWOOD (2008), a show that is set in the Whoniverse (Captain Hart has a Vortex Manipulator). The fifth Doctor appeared on DOCTOR WHO from March 1981 to March 1984 (his manifestation as an older man is explained in the 2007 DOCTOR WHO minisode "Time Crash", which must take place immediately before this story, within the Doctor's continuity). Sheriff Carter was on EUREKA (2006-2012). The Monster Squad is from the 1987 film THE MONSTER SQUAD. The Lament Configuration and Pinhead the Cenobite first appeared in Clive Barker's The Hellbound Heart (1986) and continue to dominate the HELLRAISER franchise.

2013--MAY 11 - Ivan and the Doctor seal a Steampunk Dimensional Overlay in Waltham, MA caused by a demonic entity banished by the Red Fork Empire from their world to the Whoniverse. The Doctor (first seen in the 1963 premier of the BBC series DOCTOR WHO) is recognized as originating within the Whoniverse but he travels through time, space, and relative dimensions. The demonic entity seems to be a star spawn of Cthulhu, though it is never properly identified. The Red Fork Empire is a steampunk cosplay community representing a fictional society in an alternate dimension.

c. May 17 - June 9, 2013--DALEKS VS ALIENS (WEBCOMIC)--Daleks go looking for a lost unit and discover the xenomorphs. This story is by Rich Morris, who also wrote and drew Forever Janette. The Daleks are time travelers, and the xenomorphs have been around since early history and will be around into the far future, so it’s hard to set down a date, not that it really matters.

c. June 4, 2013--LIVE AND LET DROOD: A SECRET HISTORIES NOVEL (NOVEL BY SIMON R. GREEN)--Crosses: Nightside; Carnacki Ghost Finder; Ghost Finders; Evil Dead; The Mummy (Universal); Frankenstein (novel); Dracula (novel); Gravel; Doctor Who; She; Excalibur (Marvel). Eddie Drood is the last of his family, carrying on a legacy of protecting the world. But now he has learned that his family still lives, trapped in an alternate reality. Secret Histoires is a series of novels by Green involving Eddie Drood, who protects the world from supernatural threats. This cross brings that series into the Doctor Who Universe. Green’s Nightside is mentioned. Drood visits the Carnacki Institute, from Green’s Ghost Finders series, and named for Thomas Carnacki. There is a Kandarian reference, as in the Evil Dead. Tana leaves are also mentioned, which come from the Mummy series. Castle Frankenstein is mentioned. Eddie mentioned having fought Dracula. Finally, and the most fun in my opinion, when a character’s bow tie is mocked, Eddie says that bow ties are cool. His friend, the Travelling Doctor, said so. The Travelling Doctor is often used by writers as code for the Doctor from Doctor Who, and in this case, this is a direct reference to the Eleventh Doctor.

c. June 4, 2013--CASINO INFERNALE: A SECRET HISTORIES NOVEL (NOVEL BY SIMON R. GREEN)--(Contemporary Setting, set after the final Nightside novel)--Crosses: Nightside; Carnacki Ghost Finder; Ghost Finders; Doctor Jekyll and Mister Hyde; Wolf & Fisher; Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos; Shadows Fall; Doctor Who; Day of the Triffids; The Coming Race. Eddie is trying to bring down a bank that finances evil organizations. All the crossovers are the usual connections to Green’s works.


2013--DEC - The Arkham Ghostbusters are contacted regarding the theft of alien hardware from a secret facility in Utah a year earlier. Before they can make the trip, Captain Rogers arrives in Arkham and warns Ivan that Ordnance personnel currently have the location in lockdown and will treat Ivan's presence as a violation of the arrangement allowing him to stay retired. Likewise, the Doctor arrives and informs the Arkham Ghostbusters that no hardware, esoteric or otherwise, survived the incident in 2012, and that the call was most likely a trap. The Utah facility housing alien artifacts was breached and destroyed in DOCTOR WHO series 1 (relaunch) episode 6 "Dalek" (2005), courtesy of the ninth Doctor; the Doctor appearing here is the tenth, circa 2009. Captain Rogers is also known as Captain America (first appearing in CAPTAIN AMERICA COMICS #1, 1941), whom Ivan met in 1992. Arkham and the Ghostbusters are from Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos and Columbia's Ghostbusters franchise, respectively, and are recurring elements in Ivan stories.

December 25, 2013--The eleventh Doctor dies and regenerates into the twelfth Doctor. This Doctor's companions include (so far) Clara Oswald. Technically, counting the War Doctor and the misfired regeneration of the 10th, this is the 14th incarnation, when Time Lords only have 13. This historic record breaking extra regeneration was due to the assistance of the Time Lords. Will that mean he will get more regenerations? I guess that depends on ratings.

2014--JAN 16 - UNTOUCHED BY AN ANGEL [ANTILOGY] - Ivan is attacked by a Weeping Angel, who attempts to feed on him. His Anti-Logic "curse" prevents him from being temporarily dislocated by the angel, as his "time energy" is indigestible to them, but it also prevents the 4th Doctor from being able to assist him much, as the TARDIS refuses to depart so long as Ivan is aboard. The Doctor, meeting Ivan for the first time within his own timeline, concludes that the Anti-Logic has tainted Ivan's being on a subatomic level with Anti-Thought and Anti-Time, rendering him a space-time anomaly. The Doctor and the TARDIS are from the BBC series DOCTOR WHO (1963), though this is the 4th incarnation of the Doctor, who debuted in 1974. The Weeping Angels appeared first in "Blink", a Doctor Who episode that aired in 2007.

2014--NOV 11-18 - TIMELORD OF THE RINGS -The 8th Doctor discovers Ivan is of particular interest to the Fractal Paradox. The TARDIS, however, will still not move (or perform any other function that acknowledges Ivan's presence) while Ivan is aboard. Ivan postulates this may be related to the singularity he participated in that involved the Titanic. His efforts to study this anomaly results in the cessation of an endlessly looped videotape stored at the Arkham Ghostbusters' lab, and the creepy dead girl captured with the VHS tape in 2006 escapes, along with several duplicates created by the video-looping used to originally contain her, punctuated by a call on the Police Box telephone stating the prophetic quote "Seven Days". The Doctor notes that even the act of storing a psychic imprint in such a manner is nonsensical, and deduces that the onryō is the hybrid offspring of a human and an isomorphic being, which is something of a paradox since the ethereal cannot mate with the material. Together they detain the spirits and recombine them into a single entity, which they then trapped inside a piece of 3D Gallifreyan art called a Stasis Cube. The Doctor then deposits the cube on an uninhabited planet destined to be consumed by a black hole in a month's time. The 8th Doctor debuted in the 1996 Made-For-TV movie DOCTOR WHO and appears in specials, audio performances, and assorted literature, as opposed to the other iterations of the Doctor, who appeared within episodes of the BBC television programme. Fractal Paradox is a variation on Faction Paradox, an antagonistic organisation in some of the adventures of the 8th Doctor, but which later spun-off into a series of stories unconnected to DOCTOR WHO, which is appropriate given the nature of paradoxi. The onryō spirit is similar to the ones seen in the various books, movies, television series, etc. based on the novel Ring (リング "Ringu") by Koji Suzuki, though this character is not stated to be Sadako, Samara, or other recorded onryō / yurei character within the franchise media. Stasis Cube artwork / technology was first introduced in the 2013 Doctor Who 50th Anniversary special THE DAY OF THE DOCTOR.

2014--DEC 1 - CYBER MONDAY - The Arkham Ghostbusters are present for a Miskatonic University demonstration of Aldebaran's NAO educational robots (being proposed for aid with some of Arkham Sanitarium's less capable patients). The robot Ivan handles turns out to be harboring cybermites, which immediately begin upgrading him. Peter Fitzhume brings Ivan to the Theurgy Society's Ripton facility where they digitize Ivan into cyberspace so he might be able to fight the electronic control of his mind and body on a physical level. He finds a domain of virtual reality controlled by CLEVER, the operating system representing the consciousness of Mister Clever, complete with simulations of a doting River Song and a submissive 11th Doctor (Clever had observed the interest shown in Ivan by both the 8th Doctor and the Fractal Paradox and schemed to use this as an advantage against both parties). Ivan is outclassed and barely escapes to real space. The next day he returns to cyberspace with the painting of Vigo the Carpathian (brought to Massachusetts by Janine Melnitz from the Ghostbusters' home office). Ivan pits Vigo the Sorrow of Moldavia against Clever the self-aware cyber-mind, with control of Ivan's body as the prize. Vigo defeats Clever (with some help from Ivan), causing the cybernetic infection to burn itself out. Upon restoration of his corporeal body, Ivan briefly plays host to Vigo Von Homburg Deutschendorf, until Vigo finds that the Anti-Logic renders Ivan effectively immune to magical possession, and has no recourse but to return to the painting. Miskatonic University, Arkham Sanitarium, and Arkham, Massachusetts are elements of Howard Philip Lovecraft's CTHULHU MYTHOS. Mister Clever / CLEVER, Cybermites, River Song, the Faction Paradox, and the 8th and 11th Doctors are elements of the BBC's DOCTOR WHO franchise. Janine Melnitz and Vigo Von Homburg Deutschendorf are elements of GHOSTBUSTERS. Aldebaran Robotics is a real company based in Paris, France which began working on its Nao robots in 2004. Ripton, Massachusetts is the product of a hoax demonstrating the failings of the state capitol (Boston) to govern the western half of the state. Peter Fitzhume, the Theurgy Society, Anti-Logic, and Ivan Schabloski are elements of stories by Kevin Heim.

2014--DEC 5-25 - HYSTERIA OF THE WORLD PART 2: GRUSS VON KRAMPUS [ANTILOGY] - Ivan encounters a demonic elf and a goat-demon menacing a shopping mall, and discovers reports have been coming in across New England that Krampus, a yuletide demon known for devouring naughty children, is appearing everywhere at once. NEGATE members are deployed to handle the crisis, with Ivan teamed up with Ark Gearheart and Victor Venkman of the Real New England Ghostbusters. The Krampus demons are accompanied by devilish elves, killer snowmen, Nutcracker fiends, green grinches, evil snow queens, foul faeries, and other yule ghouls. Analysis of the situation reveals that the visible yuletide fiends are the result of the damage to the Veil that occurred in November (HYSTERIA OF THE WORLD PART 1), leaving the separation between the natural and supernatural worlds all too flimsy. While assorted Ghostbusters attempt to handle the many problems this is causing, Ivan seeks help from Velaska Pskowski to see if she can magically repair the glamour that should be concealing these types of things from humanity, and rendering them unable to physically interact with the physical world. Vela's magic reacts badly with the Anti-Logic, and Ivan's full moon transformation (on Krampusnacht, no less) begins turning him into a Krampus. The effect only lasts the night, but makes it clear that the danger will only get worse, as vampire and zombie Santas are spotted. Assorted Ghostbusters run damage control missions around the clock through Boxing Day when the majority of Christmas Spirits finally dissapate, and Vela even dons a proton pack to help out (leading her to conclude that a franchise in Springfield MA might be a good idea). Unseen by Ivan Schabloski or his allies, this exhaustive confrontation is considered a failure for Wolfram & Hart in the eyes of their client, the Fractal Paradox, who had actually ensured that no resolution could be reached before the Full Moon had passed, as they had grown suspicious that the challenges Wolfram & Hart had been throwing at Ivan were stacked in his favor. The WR&H representative points out that this situation is a global event which falls outside the parameters set up by the Fractal Paradox for these challenges, and insist that Ivan has in fact performed acceptably given his abilities. The Krampus is a popular demonic European Christmas figure associated with St. Nicholas and serving as the punisher of naughty children; it's origins appear to be Pre-Christian and it may represent an incorporation of a pagan Horned God into church tradition, a tactic used to help adapt a population to its new religion. The green-furred meanie is a Grinch of the type written of by Theodor "Dr. Seuss" Geisel in HOW THE GRINCH STOLE CHRISTMAS (1957). Killer Snowmen have been depicted in the 1997 horror comedy JACK FROST and its 2000 sequel JACK FROST 2: REVENGE OF THE MUTANT KILLER SNOWMAN. The evil snow queen appears to be a malicious version of Queen Elsa of Arendelle from the 2013 animated film FROZEN; her existence in the modern world was demonstrated in the first half of ONCE UPON A TIME season 4 (2014), though this depiction of the character does not allow for her to have left Storybrooke, Maine before returning to her own world; thus Elsa's aunt Ingrid, who has similar abilities but lived many years in the modern world outside of Storybrooke, may have assumed her niece's identity or created a doppelganger of her (or else this manifestation of the character was generated by the dark forces behind the Krampus rampages). N.E.G.A.T.E. and the assorted Ghostbusters which appear here are present-day representatives of the company Ghostbusters from the 1984 film GHOSTBUSTERS. Fractal Paradox is a variation of Faction Paradox, an antagonistic group from the DOCTOR WHO television programme (1963 to present). WF&R stands for Wolfram & Hart, an antagonistic group from ANGEL: THE SERIES (1999-2004).

2015--JAN 5-6 - ASSIMILATION3 - Clever is restored to activity and given a body via a temporal anomaly created by the Fractal Paradox, which also brings a Borg designated Locutus to the present from an alternate future timeline, created from that timeline's Jean-Luc Picard. As representatives of two varieties of cybernetic lifeforms with the ability to assimilate the local population, their presence in Arkham lead some to suspect that the Doctors West have continued their experiments with ReAnnie, their own cyborg zombie. Ivan hastily gathers other Ghostbusters to contain the damage while he obtains samples of the nanites used in ReAnnie and programs them with a new directive; to neutralize all foreign nanotechnology. The few Cybermen that are created are successfully restored before the assimilations are permanent. Before anything can be done about either Clever or Locutus, a third cybernetic commander is discovered; Davros, progenitor of the Daleks. Though the Daleks began as humanoids, like the Cybermen and Borg, they are hideously mutated before encasement in their robotic shells, and no nanites are involved in their creation. Ivan reasons that Davros, who must be here from the past, may well be the first Borg, but in having engineered the Daleks instead invalidated the timeline of the Borg, so Locutus would never exist. Locutus confirms that he is unable to detect the existence of the Borg Collective in this timeline (he is, however, unaware that many of his functions were disabled via sonic screwdriver). Insistent that the Borg must have their existence secured, Locutus attempts to force Davros to return to his originating point in time. By applying Anti-Logic, Ivan also convinces Clever that Borg technology is what created Clever's new body, thus pitting Clever and Locutus against Davros and his Daleks. The Borg and the Cyberman manage to integrate their circuits with those of Davros and override his temporal displacement against his will, which draws all of the alien cyborgs into a time warp to the Dalek command ship, located in a different point in time. The Fractal Paradox are convinced that Ivan's conscious manipulation of the Anti-Logic makes him an ideal candidate to be their Anti-Champion after all, and they remove the anomaly they placed around the Earth that was preventing the Doctor from interfering. The Fractal Paradox is a variation of the Faction Paradox, who, like Clever, the Cybermen, Davros, the Daleks, and the Sonic Screwdriver, are from the BBC series DOCTOR WHO (1963 to the present). The Borg and Locutus are from the STAR TREK franchise of television shows and movies, which first began airing in 1966 (Star Trek also contains Sonic Screwdrivers). Dr. Herbert West and the city of Arkham are elements of the Cthulhu Mythos stories of H. P. Lovecraft, who started writing at age 9 in 1899. The Ghostbusters and their associated equipment are from the 1984 film GHOSTBUSTERS. ReAnnie and Anti-Logic are original concepts which have appeared previously in the Strange Life and Interesting Timeline of Ivan Ronald Schabloski.


2015--KILL YOUR KILLER--The TARDIS is seen in the background of numerous city shots. The Fourth Doctor’s scarf is seen in a museum office. This film is dedicated to the victims of the Camp Crystal Lake Massacre(s).

The So-Called Near Future--SHE-HULK # 5--Doctor Bong sends She-Hulk to the future, where she encounters Robocop.

2018--IRON SKY--A tiny TARDIS can be spotted among the spaceships when the Earth fleet is introduced.

2021--TALES OF THE SHADOWMEN VOLUME 4: LORDS OF TERROR “CAPTAIN FUTURE AND THE LUNAR PERIL” (SHORT STORY BY MATTHEW BAUGH)--(Setting is 1969 and 2021 A.D.)--Crosses: Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos; Captain Future; Madame Atomos; Future Times Three; John Carter; Erik John Stark; Northwest Smith; Venus stories of C.L. Moore; Callisto; The Door to Saturn; The Insects from Shaggai; The Family Tree of the Gods; Outlaw World; the Nyctalope; Flash Gordon; Carson of Venus; The Seven Space Stones; Hawk Carse; From the Earth to the Moon; The First Men in the Moon; Lost Paradise; Lancelot Biggs; The Plutonian Drug; The Interplanetary Huntress; Vulthoom; Doctor Omega; Black Thirst; Doctor Who. In 1969, Madame Atomos, the extreme super-villainess, sets up a booby trap device on the moon, which is discovered by a time traveller who then travels to 2021 to warn them. However, he arrives in a divergent timeline. The divergence was likely caused by his own interference in 1969 events. The future he travels to is a 2021 that is extremely advanced. Earth has regular interplanetary travel and contact with other species. All the planets of our solar system are inhabited, and all the tropes of early science fiction and its predictions of the 21st century are in play. Author Matthew Baugh links many sci-fi stories here and places them in this Sci-Fi Universe. Pluto is called Yuggoth in this alternate timeline, which is from the Cthulhu Mythos of Lovecraft. As for all those other crossovers, you should buy the Tales of the Shadowmen volume and read the story.

2020s--PACIFIC RIM (FILM)--Crosses: Hellboy (film); Godzilla (2014); Godzilla (original); Portal; Doctor Who. A portal opens that sends giant monsters from their dimension to ours over a period of time, a few at a time. The humans fight back by creating giant robots. Pacific Rim takes place in a divergent timeline. Even though the main story is set in our near future, the monsters are said to have started to show up in 2013. When Gypsy Danger travels to the monster dimension, the Crystal Prison from Hellboy is seen. In flashbacks to the early days of the war against the monsters, Godzilla’s roar is heard, lining up with the 2014 Godzilla film. The GLaDOS operating system in this film is from the Portal video games. Some argue that the drift technology in this film is a crossover with Doctor Who. Others say it’s not. I’m including it and letting the reader decide. The Serizawa Scale is used to determine the size of the monsters (called kaiju). Serizawa was the scientist in the original Godzilla film. One of his family was also an expert in the 2014 film. The 2014 film references that the original events from 1954 also happened, It seems that the Pacific Rim timeline may have diverged during the events of the original Godzilla film.

2037-2040s AD--PREDATOR: XENOGENESIS--Birmingham, England: The organization known as Spearhead is formed to combat Predators with state of the art technology. At the same time, Subotai, an immortal Japanese samurai, decides on a final showdown with the Predators. (date revised and roughly estimated by SpaceWuss. Must take place after AVP: Eternal, because London is now underwater, but was present in that story. BUT the novel Predator: Forever Midnight states that in 2117 it has been "nearly a hundred years without recorded incident" of any Predator appearances. 2037 would be 80 years previous which, while pushing the '"nearly hundred years" comment, could still be said to be close to a hundred years. Though 12 years is pretty quick for the sinking of a city.)

Five years after the great war--TO DUST--In this series set at some indeterminate period of the near future, Earth’s environment has become nearly unlivable. Hidden within the title sequence of this series are terms such as “Mad Man has a Box” and “Vote Saxton.”

2099--PREDATOR 2099--A Predator hunts during a civil war in the underdeveloped nations.

2119--BURNING HEART--The Doctor has in adventure set in the world of JUDGE DREDD. This takes place in the Whoniverse. Dredd will also encounter BATMAN, PREDATOR, and ALIEN.

2119--PREDATOR VERSUS JUDGE DREDD--See my comments on Judge Dredd's encounter with Aliens.

2120--DOCTOR WHO--"Wheel in Space"--A character in this episode wears a costume that would be recycled in Empire Strikes Back for one of the bounty hunters. Doctor Who takes place in the Whoniverse, and Star Wars in the distant past of the Whoniverse, but travel between time periods seems common amongst space and time travelers.

2122--ALIEN--USCSS Nostromo encounters what is assumed to be a distress signal emanating from the planetoid designated LV-426, in the Zeta-2-Reticuli system. Captain Dallas, Executive Officer Kane, and Navigator Lambert investigate a derelict spacecraft that contains the fossilised remains of an unknown alien species, and thousands of Xenomorph eggs. One of the xenomorph spore (‘facehugger’) attaches itself to Kane’s face and plants an embryo in his throat, which then hatches, killing the host. The hatchling (‘chestburster’) grows to over 7 feet tall and kills Dallas and Engineer’s Mate Brett. Warrant Officer Ripley discovers that Weyland-Yutani want the Alien specimen and the crew of the Nostromo are expendable. It is revealed Science Officer Ash is in fact a Hyperdyne Systems 120-A/2 android, who has been protecting the Alien. Chief Engineer Parker renders Ash inoperative when Ash attacks Ripley. Parker and Lambert are killed by the Alien whilst evacuating the Nostromo. Ripley rigs the ship to self-destruct and escapes on the shuttlecraft Narcissus with the ship’s cat Mr Jones. The Alien also escapes on the shuttle, but Ripley manages to blow it out of the airlock, effectively killing it. See http://time.absoluteavp.com/ for an excellent Alien timeline.

2125--JUDGE DREDD VERSUS ALIENS--The title is pretty much self-explanatory. Note that I'm not that familiar with Judge Dredd (I saw the movie), but from what I do know, it doesn't seem that the future of Judge Dredd really contradicts that of either Alien or Doctor Who.

2161--FALLOUT--The Doctor visits the divergent reality of Fallout in which the 1950's never really ended and there was a nuclear war on October 23, 2077.

22nd Century--STAR TREK: ENTERPRISE--"Future Tense"--A ship is bigger on the inside than on the outside.

2179--ALIENS--Ellen Ripley wakes up from suspended animation and gets sent out by "the company" to go fight more Aliens.

2179--AVATAR--This film features the Colonial Marines working for "the Company", just like in Aliens. They both use similar type human controlled robot machines, and they are both directed by James Cameron. 'Nuff said?

2179--ALIEN3--Ellen is the last survivor, well, except for an Alien. They both end up on a prison ship where Ellen...dies.

2189--OUTBREAK/NIGHTMARE ASYLUM--Featuring Wilks and Billie.

Possibly the 23rd Century--BLAKE'S 7--Chris Boucher's novel Corpse Marker, a sequel to The Robots of Death, features the psychostrategist Carnell, a character who had first appeared in the Blake's 7 episode Weapon. The novel indicates that he settled on Kaldor two years after he first went on the run from the Federation, which would have followed his failure in Weapon. The character appeared again in the Kaldor City series of audios. Note that because the Federation is evil in this series, that Blake's 7 may exist in the Mirror Universe (which the Doctor calls Pete's World.) However, the Federation of the Mirror Universe is actually the Earth Empire, so it could be that in the Whoniverse, the Federation isn't so nice as in the TVCU.


2267--THE DOCTOR AND THE ENTERPRISE--The Doctor met the crew of the Enterprise (from STAR TREK) and visited a planet from the DARKOVER series.

2268--ISHMAEL--At the Wonder Bar at Starbase 12, Han Solo (STAR WARS) is present, fighting with Starbuck and Apollo (BATTLESTAR GALACTICA). They were fighting over Sarah Jane Smith, who then leaves with the Doctor (DOCTOR WHO). Solo is from another galaxy in the distant past. Starbuck and Apollo are from the 1970s on a journey from their homeworld to Earth. It's likely the Doctor is responsible for bringing them all here, and it's presumed he got them all home. Kirk makes a comment about Sherlock Holmes, his relationship to Spock. Two Hokas are also seen (EARTHMAN'S BURDEN). They are cute living teddy bears. The main portion involves Spock traveling back in time (not with the Doctor) and meeting the Stemples (HERE COME THE BRIDES). Other western characters encountered are from PALADIN/HAVE GUN, WILL TRAVEL, BONANZA and MAVERICK. There is also an appearance of Straus and Sons which comes from James Clavell's Asian Saga: SHOGUN, TAI-PAN, GAI-JIN, KING RAT, NOBLE HOUSE, WHIRLWIND, and ESCAPE.

24th Century--STAR TREK: THE NEXT GENERATION--"The Naked Now"--Riker uses a "sonic driver" while helping the chief engineer.

Late 24th Century--DOCTOR WHO/STAR TREK--The Doctor teams with Picard and his crew in the TVCU against the Borg and Cybermen.

February 2369 to Unknown--STAR TREK: DEEP SPACE NINE--Commander Sisko commands Deep Space Nine, a space station that orbits Bajor and also watches over a wormhole between the Alpha and Gamma Quadrants. (We're in the Alpha, of course.) The station was once run by the Cardassians, until the Bajorans won their freedom. During the run of the show, many shops and services were located or used on the station. This included the Banzai Institute (still in existence since BUCKAROO BANZAI), Cavor's Gravity Devices (from THE FIRST MEN IN THE MOON), Del Floria's Tailor Shop (a front for THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E.), Diet Smith Corporation (from DICK TRACY), FORBIN PROJECT, Milliways (from THE RESTAURANT AT THE END OF THE UNIVERSE...note that I placed the film version of HITCHHIKER'S in the Doctor Who Universe, but the books are in the TVCU), Sirius Cybernetics Corporation (from HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY), Spacely Sprockets (from the JETSONS), Tom Servo's Used Robots, and Yoyodyne Propulsion Systems (again from BUCKAROO BANZAI).

2381--ALIEN: RESURRECTION--Ripley has been cloned, along with the Aliens.

Late 24th Century--ALIENS VERSUS PREDATOR VERSUS THE TERMINATOR--Comic mini-series pulls in the Terminator franchise into the Whoniverse. Note that the first two Terminator films and the SARAH CONNOR CHRONICLES occur in the TVCU. In the Whoniverse, at least the first two films occur, though the third can't since obviously Judgement Day has not come to pass. Likely the Whoniverse timeline is the timeline that includes John Connor becoming a U.S. Senator, and then the Rise of the Machines likely is tied into the third world war.

26th Century--FIREFLY--Weyland-Yutani still exists in the future of Firefly.

30th Century--STAR TREK/LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES--The Enterprise Crew and the Legion are both from different realities. Since we’ve established a Trek cross already, let’s presume that the Enterprise comes from the Doctor Who Universe and the Legion from the Television Crossover Universe. The Earth Empire of the temporarily amalgamated reality under the rule of Vandal Savage have a collection of time machines from DOCTOR WHO, BILL & TED'S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE, HOT TUB TIME MACHINE, THE FLASH, PRINCE OF PERSIA, STAR TREK, STARGATE, STAR TREK: THE NEXT GENERATION, STAR TREK: VOYAGER, VOYAGERS, RIP HUNTER, BACK TO THE FUTURE, THE TIME TUNNEL, TIME AFTER TIME, THE TIME MACHINE, and TIME COP.

March 3011?--FUTURAMA--"Mobius Dick"--When the rest of the people come outside of the whale, the fourth Doctor from Doctor Who is shown walking out.

November 3011?--FUTURAMA--"All the Presidents' Heads"--When the Planet Express Crew arrive in "West Britannia", a double decker bus is shown stopping across the street from the Planet Express building, right next to a Police Box. A man in a long, colorful scarf gets out of the bus and steps into the Police Box. This is a reference to the British TV show, Doctor Who. The man is a clear reference to the Fourth Doctor (the Fourth Doctor also wore a long, colorful scarf), played by Tom Baker. "Amelia Pond" appears as a future president's head.

3955--TALES OF THE SHADOWMEN VOLUME 3: DANSE MACABRE--"Beware the Beasts"--Just accidentally stumbled across this one while looking for something else. The Whoniverse's Q creates the alternate reality that is the PLANET OF THE APES. If this is true, one must wonder if he is responsible for the later alterations seen in the last two films.

c. 4000---PREDATOR VERSUS MAGNUS ROBOT FIGHTER--Predators exist in the TVCU and the Whoniverse, but since Magnus has no TVCU connection, it must occur in the Whoniverse.

51st Century--DOCTOR WHO--"A Good Man Goes to War"--So, Ollu and Buzsla are no longer part of the TVCM, but there is a lineage of fat ones and thin ones instead. At some point between the present and this era, the Abbotts and Costellos of the Doctor Who Universe have future descendants who finally accept that the only true love they have is for each other, and they marry. In the 51st century, they are now only referring to themselves by what many others have called their forefathers for thousands of years: the fat one and the thin one. They have joined a military force that considers the Doctor the enemy. Sadly, they are killed during this event, and the lineage may end here.

3,002,182--RED DWARF--"Thanks for the Memory"--The TARDIS appears in this episode.

3,002,385--RED DWARF--"Psirens"--In a ship graveyard is a Weyland-Yutani ship. Weyland-Yutani is from ALIEN. It's possible that the future timeline of Alien occurs in the Whoniverse. Weyland-Yutani is mentioned on Angel. In this episode an Eagle ship from SPACE: 1999 also appears, but that show does not work in either the TVCU or the Whoniverse. It's likely either a wormhole pulled the ship from an alternate universe or else this type of ship still existed in the Whoniverse.

3,002,394--RED DWARF--"Back to Earth"--The Red Dwarf crew end up on CORONATION STREET.

Five Billion and Forty-Three--DOCTOR WHO--"Gridlock"--On a distant world, long after Earth is gone, there is a New Earth and a New New York. New New York happens to have the same skyline as NNY of Futurama, and there is a character named Brannigan, who must be a descendant of Zap.

ALTERNATE REALITIES:

TVCU-1-Cartoon Universe (also has its own inner multiverse, as seen in various cartons. These are mostly one time seen worlds). In TINY TOON ADVENTURES episode “A Quack in the Quarks”, In Duck Vader’s landing bay are various space vessels from WAR OF THE WORLDS (NOVEL and 1953 FILM), 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY, BUCK ROGERS (1934 SERIAL), DOCTOR WHO, STAR WARS, EARTH VS. THE FLYING SAUCERS, STAR TREK, LOST IN SPACE, LAND OF THE GIANTS, VOYAGE TO THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA, and FORBIDDEN PLANET. Buster and Babs steal Duck Dodgers’ ship to save Plucky.

TVCU-15-(has its own hypertime of divergent timelines)--CINEVERSE: I thought that perhaps the Peter Cushing films could fit in, until I realized that they are alternate versions of the same events from the first two Daleks serials of the series. So I place them here instead.

TVCU-19-PETE'S WORLD--A side reality to the world in which DOCTOR WHO takes place is referred to as Pete's World, after the character Peter Tyler, who had been dead some years in the main Whoniverse but is still alive in this one. Due to some odd circumstances Rose Tyler (daughter of Peter in the Whoniverse, but who never existed in Pete's World) migrated to this alternate reality, along with her mother Jackie and friend Mickey Smith (whose Pete's World counterparts had recently died). A primary distinction between Pete's World and the Whoniverse is that Pete's World has no indigenous Gallifreyans, though it did acquire one when the 10th Doctor caused his severed hand to regenerate into a half human / half time lord duplicate of himself, and left this duplicate in Pete's World with Rose. - The Ivan Ronald Schabloski of this reality lived a similar life to that of his TVCU counterpart, becoming a Ghostbuster in 2012. In the year 2013 (time flows differently between realities, so it may not have occurred at the same time in the TVCU) Ivan met the Doctor's hybrid hand clone and Rose Tyler (both originally from the Whoniverse). Conversely, the TVCU Ivan has never met any of the Doctor's traveling companions.

TVCU-28-ROBOT CHICKEN UNIVERSE--Are you surprised that the RCU has a counterpart to the Doctor? The characters from Battlestar Galactica, RoboCop, and the Terminator also have counterparts here.

TVCU-29-Skitlandia and non-canon commercials--LASER CATS--The placement of this series is questionable, but it has links to Alien, Avatar, E.T. and Close Encounters of the Third Kind. NOT SURE HOW TO CLASSIFY THIS--Wayne Campbell, of SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE's WAYNE'S WORLD, had a fantasy where he is on Melrose Place. Wayne exists in Skitlandia. (I tried to fit him into the Doctor Who Universe or TVCU due to his meeting a TERMINATOR, but I just couldn't figure why the T-2000 would travel from Los Angeles to Milwaukee, then back to Los Angeles when trying to track Jon Connor.) But this is a fantasy world within the mind of Wayne. Should this even count as an alternate reality? Including it anyways for the sake of completeness.

TVCU-34-MHU (Miskatonic Horror Universe, aka Monster / Hunter Universe)==A world where Ivan's adventures are not apocryphal. In this world, Powerkid had the greatest adventures never told, and sadly, James Bojaciuk is dead. This reality is very similar to the TVCU with a few major distinctions. In this world, the Doctor from DOCTOR WHO is native, while the characters and events of the STAR TREK franchise are set in a parallel reality. The 1898 Martian Invasion (WAR OF THE WORLDS) did not occur on this Earth, as it was forestalled by H. G. Wells, Dr. Moreau, the Invisible Man, and others in space, as depicted in K. J. Anderson's The Martian War: A Thrilling Eyewitness Account of the Recent Invasion As Reported by Mr. H.G. Wells (2006), negating Alan Moore's League of Extraordinary Gentlemen franchise and several other follow-up stories. The MHU also has no living Muppets, and several fictional cities (not based on horror franchises) found in the TVCU (such as Riverdale) are merged with real cities (such as Haverhill, MA). - Ivan's timeline in this reality is virtually identical to the timeline for the TVCU albeit with additional horror and non-horror franchises not recognized as connected to the TVCU (UNDERWORLD,BATMAN FOREVER, etc.), and minus the Muppets.

TVCU-44-Whoniverse--DOCTOR WHO: THE MAN IN THE VELVET MASK--The Doctor for the DOCTOR WHO UNIVERSE travels to this one where there is a French version of the Village with the Marquis de Sade as Monsieur 6.

TVCU-52--The Horror Universe, as demonstrated within the Horror Crossover Encyclopedia, is a horror centered variation of the Television Crossover Universe that includes Doctor Who.


TVCU-63--Homage/pastiche of Lucas Garrett's Doctor Who/Back to the Future amalgamations (a world where the question of Doctor Who is answered with "Brown!")-From Jose Ricardo Bondoc: Two females who regularly travelled through time would be Samantha Stephens ("Bewitched"), "Endora" (Bewitched") and Jeannie Nelson ("I Dream of Jeannie"). All of them never aged, and with the case of Bewitched, you had incarnations....

TVCU-69?--Porn universe-The reality of THE DOCTOR WHORE PORN PARODY.

TVCU-89--BONGO UNIVERSE: This universe's Doctor in various regenerated forms has appeared on FAMILY GUY, AMERICAN DAD, and THE SIMPSONS. These shows have actually been identified as taken place in towns that exist within the "Bongo Anomaly", in which the locations coexist in the TVCU and Looniverse at the same time, and so the appearances of the Doctor here are probably the real Doctor of the Whoniverse, though he may be slightly altered in appearance and character by the nature of the anomaly.

2 comments:

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  2. TARDIS wiki:
    "In Doctor Who Magazine issue 469, Steven Moffat stated that he wrote a scene for TV: The Day of the Doctor in which Kate Stewart would walk past posters for the Peter Cushing films while noting the "need to screen the Doctor's known associates". Moffat explained that he believed the films existed in the DWU as "distorted accounts" of the Doctor's adventures. However, the production team could not afford the rights to the posters."

    ReplyDelete